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July 13, 2011
July 11-15
First Baptist Church, 290 East Winchester Street,  will hold Vacation Bible School 5:45 p.m.-8 p.m. nightly classes for all ages, youth and adult.  
July 11-15
Community Bible Church in Westmoreland is hosting their Vacation Bible School nightly from 6 to 9 for ages three to high school. The theme is “Big Apple Adventure” For more information, call 388-7650.
July 14
Aglow International meets at 7 p.m. at 135 Jones Street. For more information, call 202-1953.
July 15
Sumner County Archives is hosting “Meet the Historian Authors of Sumner County”  between 2 and 4 p.m.  The Archives offers a unique opportunity to meet and ask questions of our county historians. The authors’ books will also be available for purchase and signing.For further details contact Sumner County Archives at 365 North Belvedere Drive, 452-0037, www.sumnertn.org/archives.
July 15
Gallatin Senior Citizens Center’s Pot Luck/ Dance, Rock-n-Country Band. 6:00 - Potluck, 7:00 - 9:30 Dance. $5.00 for one $7.50 for two.
July 16
Cornerstone General Baptist Church is hosting a huge yard sale at 8 a.m. to benefit Honduras Mission Team. The church is located at 1415 E. Broadway.
July 16
Trinity Lutheran Church is having an indoor rummage sale at 720 Lock 4 Road, 8 to 2.
July 16
A fashion show and brunch, sponsored by Sumner County NAACP is 10 a.m. until noon at Rucker Stewart Middle School. Fashions by Williams Design & Fashion, Belk, D & K Menswear and Cart Mart Designers Hats by Beverly will be present. Tickets are $10. Call 822-7840 or 452-8754 for more information.
July 16
Gallatin Morning Rotary Club invites you to join them in support of the Gallatin Public Library to increase our community resources by donating new and gently used books. Please, no encyclopedias, text books, condensed books or magazines. Books will be accepted from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
July 17
Hickory Grove Missionary Baptist Church, 3504 Hartsville Pike, Castalian Springs’ Annual Homecoming Service is at 11 a.m. message will be delivered by Reverend Thomas O. Staten, Pastor of Hickory Grove Baptist Church. 3 p.m. guest will be Pastor B. L. Chandler and the congregation from Parkers Chapel Baptist Church, Portland. Dinner will be served. Everyone is welcome.
July 18
Be a part of a live studio audience featuring:   Jason Crabb, The Bowlings, Triumphant,  The Martins, Karen Peck and New River, Legacy Five, The Nelons, Jeff and Sheri Easter, The Hoppers. Show begins at 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. There are 1500 free seats at Trinity Music City, 1 Music Village Blvd. Hendersonville. For more information: 822-8333.
July 19
Salem Community Club meets at 6:30 p.m. Please bring a dish. A silent auction will be held to fund building upkeep. Call 452-5212 or 452-3845 for more information.
July 19-23
Zion Upper Room Apostolic Faith Church, 365 North Blakemore,  is hosting the Apostolic Assemblies of Christ 41st National Convention with classes during the day and nightly services at 7:00. All are welcome.  For more information, call 452-5704.
July 21
State Farm Insurance presents 3rd Thursday on Main featuring entertainer, Bobby Bare, Jr. at 6:30 p.m.on the square. This free, family friendly concert is a Greater Gallatin, Inc. event.
July 22
Sumner Spay Neuter Clinic Open House is
5:00 to 7:30 p.m. at 1033 Union School Road - Gallatin, (Across from Benny Bills School).
July 22, 23
Class of 1986 Reunion Schedule: July 22, 7 p.m. until ?,Whippoorwill, formerly Swaney Swift Drugs. July 23, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., covered shelter in the back of Triple Creek Park. Bring your family, lawn chairs and picnic lunch. This is a free event. The main event: July 23, 6 p.m. until ? Hampton Inn, Gallatin. $50 per person/$100 per couple.Rooms will be available for $84 plus tax. Call 206-9595 for reservations. Chef Christopher is catering the event. Checks accepted,   mail to GHS CLASS OF 1986,  1010 BROOKWOOD DRIVE GALLATIN TN 37066, or bring payment to the Hampton Inn. Call Mary 330-1952, Michele 351-7501 or Annette 483-9625 or 206-9595--Annette is our contact person at the Hampton Inn.
July 23
Bethpage Masonic Lodge #521 is hosting a Spaghetti Supper from 5 to 8 p.m. Proceeds benefit a scholarship fund and other lodge charities. Cost is $5 per person for all you care to eat.
July 23
NAACP Youth presents Southern  Fish Fry and Spaghetti with Chef Ronnie at Municipal Park from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. Delivery available. For more information, or to order call 495-4974, 934-8185 or 775-4533.
FYI
Thrifty Paw is now open at 222 Fairgrounds Road (Behind the Post Office). Hours are Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 8:00 a.m.– 2:00 p.m. Proceeds benefit Sumner Spay Neuter Alliance (“Low Cost” Spay Neuter Clinic). Furniture, household & childrens items, books, CD’s, and more good stuff. They will gladly accept your unwanted items. Contact Beckie, 210-3296 to arrange a pickup.

A Support group for Parkinsons patients and spouses/caregivers meets at The Blackeyed Pea restaurant in Hendersonville the first Monday of every month at 6 p.m.

Alzheimer’s Support Group meets the first Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at Elmcroft of Hendersonville, 1020 Carrington Place, 264-2440.

Sertoma of Gallatin has a drop off box at the Gallatin Senior Citizens Center on Franklin St. near the square for anyone who would like to donate a used hearing aid to be given to HEAR Nashville to refurbish and provide hearing for someone who cannot afford a hearing aid on their own.

FARMERS MARKET is open Monday through Friday 10 to 6 and Saturdays 7 to 12. A variety of homemade breads and jellies, landscaping items/plants, vegetables and flowers are available. On Facebook, go to Gallatin Farmers Market and ‘like’ it and you will be notified weekly as items change at the market or call 452-5692 to get registered.
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Heat warning issued

The National Weather Service has put out a warning for Middle Tennessee that Monday and Tuesdays temperatures will be dangerously high, with the heat index rising to 112-115 range.

Heat index values will top 115 degrees in some places and a wide swath of heat advisories, heat watches and excessive heat warnings have already been issued. The excessive heat is expected to continue through Tuesday across much of this area.

The public is cautioned to reduce outdoor activities and to keep children and pets out of parked, closed cars and iinside as much as possible.

Also,  those who have health issues should contact their personal physicians if excessive exposure to heat is suspected.

The public should keep drinking water available at all times.

The high temperatures are expected to continue throughout the week.

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July 6, 2011
Maynard L. Crowder
age 86, of Bethpage, passed away Friday, July 1, 2011. Funeral service is today, Wednesday, July 6 at 2:00 p.m. from the chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home with Brother Jimmy Anderson officiating. Interment follows in Rock Bridge Cemetery with family and friends serving as pallbearers. Remaining visitation is today from noon until time of service.  Mr. Crowder was born July 15, 1924 in Sumner County, son of the late Mitchell Solomon Crowder and Carrie Jane Brown Crowder. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by his wife Elsie Marie Swallows Crowder, brothers Noble Crowder, Roy Crowder, Harold Crowder and Leonard “Ben” Crowder and sisters, Frances Marie Crowder and Edna Harrington. He is survived by his sons, Thomas Leon Crowder and wife Judy of Westmoreland, Jerry Wayne Crowder and wife, Linda, Earl Crowder, Ronnie Crowder and wife, Jennifer all of Gallatin and Marty Crowder and wife, Cherie of Bethpage; daughters, Janice Lee Shrum and husband, James of Gallatin, Brenda Ann Heinrich and husband, Ken of Bethpage; brother Kenneth Crowder of Greenbrier; 18 grandchildren; 28 great grandchildren and 15 great-great grandchildren. Mr. Crowder worked 35 years at Genesco and 15 years at Sumner Regional Medical Center. Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com.
Shannon Renee Carson Moore
was born in Orangeburg, South Carolina to Carl and Patricia Carson on December 6, 1969 and passed away in her sleep in her Nashville home on July 3, 2011, age 41. She is survived by her husband, Donald Moore of Nashville; daughter Ashley Elizabeth Lee of Lebanon; son Tyler James Tidball of Hendersonville; stepdaughters Lauren and Katherine Moore of Nashville; parents Rick and Patricia Harrison of Westmoreland and Carl and Marcia Carson of Fyffe, Alabama; paternal grandmother, Lorene Carson Hutto of Santee, South Carolina; brother Donnie Carson of Kalispell, Montana; stepbrother Troy Harrison of Brandon, Mississippi; stepsister, Wendy Taylor of Westmoreland; stepsister Andrea Harrison of Westmoreland; stepsister Samantha Harrison of Leesville, Louisiana; as well as aunts and uncles, several cousins and nieces and nephews and other friends. She is preceded in death by paternal grandfather, Phillip Carson; maternal grandparents, Erva Lee and Anne K. Shoemake; uncles James Ervin Shoemake and Cecil Charles Carson. The family requests that sympathy be expressed in the form of a memorial donation to the funeral expenses at the office of Woodard Funeral Home in Westmoreland. Ms. Moore requested to be cremated. Private graveside services will be held at Siloam Church Cemetery. The family wishes to express many thanks to Woodard Funeral Home in Westmoreland for handling the arrangements.
Willie Mae Johnson
After a great, well-lived life, Willie Mae Johnson, age 64, of Gallatin, passed away Tuesday, July 5, 2011 at her residence. Mrs. Johnson, a native of Natchez, MS, was preceded in death by parents, Elsie Smith, James Smith and Phillip Mosby and a dear granddaughter, Jasmine Geshaun Johnson. A celebration of her life will be held Monday, July 11 at noon with Pastor Derrick Jackson officiating at First Baptist Church at 290 East Winchester Street. The family will receive friends from 11-12. She is survived by her dear husband of 44 years, George Johnson Sr.; son, George (Alicia) Johnson Jr.; daughters,  Melinda R. Johnson of Atlanta, GA, Jessica L. Johnson of LaVergne, TN and Tonya (Maurey) Williams of Arlington, VA; one feisty granddaughter, Skye Jenise Johnson; and a large group of family and friends. Interment held Sumner Memorial Gardens. New Generation Funeral Home, 615-365-7105. newgenerationfh.com.
Bill Spears
age 74, of Portland, passed away Tuesday, July 5, 2011. Memorial service will be Saturday, July 9 at 3:00 p.m. from Lakeside Church in Westmoreland with Brother Leon Graves officiating.  Mr. Spears was born December 1, 1936, in Sumner County, son of the late Haskell and Cammie Perry Spears. He is survived by his wife, Penny Ellsworth Spears of Portland; sons, Stephen Spears and wife Jill, of Gallatin and Frank Spears of Portland; sister Carolyn Mandrell of Gallatin; grandchildren Braden Spears and Maddox Spears; nieces Jan Gross and husband Dwayne and Jill Mandrell; great niece, Peightyn Gross and great nephew Dylan Gross all of Gallatin. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to American Diabetes Association, 220 Great Circle Road, Suite 134, Nashville, TN  37228.  Online condolences may be made at familyheritagefh.com   Family Heritage Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
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Board votes to seek alternative to '81 Act

By Corey Conley
Corey@thegallatinnews.com

The Board of Education is still attempting to head off the districts pending financial consolidation by the County Commission. Just before a failed vote to repeal the 81 Act that allows the consolidation, Commissioner David Kimbrough proposed an amendment. This amendment would have created a special committee in the event that the 81 Act had been successfully repealed.

The amendment spurred Board Chairman Don Long to take action. Working with Board Attorney Jim Fuqua, he drafted a resolution intended to reassure commissioners that the board would act on such an offer if the 81 Act was repealed.

Since that meeting I have heard that there are perhaps few commissioners who had concerns about this boards willingness to cooperate with them in drafting a private act that is in the benefit to both the county general folks and the school board folks, said Long.

The resolution calls for the establishing of a committee to explore ways to improve the efficiency  in the financial management and operations, through the creation of a private act. The private act would be unrelated to the 81 Act which gives broad powers to the county commission over the schools finances and day-to-day operation.

I just wanted this board to take a formal position that we are willing to cooperate, we recognize that perhaps there are benefits to sharing certain things and working through those issues together, said Long.

The resolutions proposed Joint Private Act Committee would be composed of top officials from the two bodies.

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BOLD Enough Rodeo Friday and Saturday

On Friday and Saturday night, Jjuly 8-9, at Triple Creek Park, one of the most exciting events in Gallatin takes place as the Sumner County Anti-Drug Coalition, along with the Tennessee National Guard, hosts their the annual BOLD Enough Rodeo Challenge.
The event is the non-profit groups major fundraising activity of the year. Their mission is to eliminate substance abuse, and with the help of partners, they bring their mission to the publics attention with educational  programs like S.T.A.R.S., for example, that  reaches young people in our communities.
They also sponsor the Prescription Drug Disposal days with local law enforcement, Students Against Destrucitve Decisions, the Victims Impact Panel, as well as a training course at Voiunteer State Community College, among other projects.
This weekend, Tennessees Hedrick Rodeo, owned and managed by Danny and Jessica Hedrick, is returning for the third year with their non-stop entertainment, such as the colorful patriotic parade that opens each night, and featuring acts like Jessicas  Roman riding on two American Paint horses.
Making it truly a family event, the couples children, Justin and Emily, participate as well.
And, of course, this is an opportunity for the public to see genuine cowboys, cowgirls and Indians, of course, practice the skills originating with the American West and continued today.
Competitions include calf roping, steer wrestling, saddleback bronc riding, breakaway roping, team roping, barrell racing, and the popular bull riding.
Along with the rodeo show, various vendors and organizations will have booths with scrumptious fare and unusual items and activities for families and children.
The crowds are friendly, as everyone has a great time; there are prizes to be had and great food to enjoy, so plan to get your $10 ticket at Perkins Drugs and Gift Shoppe and Sumner County Co-Op.
When the gates open at 5 p.m., each night, the price of an adult ticket is $15,  $5 for children 5-12, and children under five are admitted free of charge.
Bring your straw hat and wear comfortable bootsits a great weekend for the entire family.

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'We will fight ... night and day...'

Were proud of this community; were proud of this land.  
And I want you to take this message back to Mr. Hoover: We will take this fight. We will fight, we will fight ... we will go night and day. We will not give up.  You have stepped onto a hornets nest here.
        Tom Neal     

By Marjorie Lloyd
Marjorie@thegallatinnews.com

Tom Neal ended the open meeting at The Bethel Brown Chamber of the County Administration Building last Thursday night with his spur-of-the-moment remarks (above) in response to all that he had heard during the question-and-answer session hosted by representatives from Hoover, Inc.

The company plans to mine a quarry on more than 350 acres of land in the Castalian Springs area, dependent upon approval of a conditional use permit by the countys Board of Zoning Appeals.  That hearing is scheduled for July 14, at 6 p.m., again at the Brown Chamber of the CAB.

There was standing-room only, with people lining the walls and another line extending into the lobby, even a few sitting on the floor. The occasion was the open meeting hosted by Tom White, the attorney for Hoover Inc., the company behind the company created in April, Western Farm Products, LLC in order to purchase four parcels of land off Old Highway 25 in Castalian Springs. (See Quarry buys land in Castalian Springs in the June 15 edition of The Gallatin Newspaper.)

White stated at the beginning of the meeting that this was a voluntary meeting that Hoover, Inc. was hosting and that even though they disagreed on many things, at least the company was attempting to keep the residents informed about exactly what they were proposing for the site.

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July 6-23, 2011

July 6-August 10

Workshop on the basics of learning to Live Well with Chronic Medical Conditions is approximately 2.5 hours per week for six weeks, each Wednesday morning. All materials are provided. There is no fee for the workshop. The focus is on older adults with chronic conditions and on those who provide care for them. For more information and to register, call Marilyn Whalen, at the Greater Nashville Area Agency on Aging, 891-5864.  The sessions will be held at Volunteer State Community College and space will be limited.
July 9
Trinity Lutheran Church’s Parents Day Out program is having a fund raiser rummage sale at the Church  at 720 Lock 4 Road, from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m.
July 9
“Under the Big Top” Vacation Bible School welcomes babies through middle school at Union Chapel Church, 1125 College Street, Portland.
July 10
 “Homecoming” at Peach Valley Baptist Church 508 Peach Valley Road, with Pastor Dexter D. Mims. The 8 a.m. guest speaker is Pastor James Brooks and Laguardo Baptist Church (Breakfast will be served) and at 11 a.m., Pastor Dexter D. Mims speaks. (Dinner will be served between  11 and 3) At 3 p.m. Pastor Denzil Bryant and St. John Baptist Church, Hartsville will be the afternoon guest.
July 11
Mayor Jo Ann Graves is hosting a open meeting as part of the city’s Listening Tour, at Stars and Stripes, starting at 5 p.m. The public is invited.
July 11-15
First Baptist Church, 290 East Winchester Street,  will hold Vacation Bible School 5:45 p.m.-8 p.m. nightly Classes for all ages, youth and adult.  
July 11-15
Community Bible Church in Westmoreland is hosting their Vacation Bible School nightly from 6 to 9 for ages three to high school. The theme is “Big Apple Adventure” For more information, call 388-7650.
July 14
Aglow International meets at 7 p.m. at 135 Jones Street. For more information, call 202-1953.
July 16
A fashion show and brunch, sponsored by Sumner County NAACP is 10 a.m. until noon at Rucker Stewart Middle School. Fashions by Williams Design & Fashion, Belk, D & K Menswear and Cart Mart Designers Hats by Beverly will be present. Tickets are $10. Call 822-7840 or 452-8754 for more information.
July 16
Gallatin Morning Rotary Club invites you to join them in support of the Gallatin Public Library to increase our community resources by donating new and gently used books. Please, no encyclopedias, text books, condensed books or magazines. Books will be accepted from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
July 17
Hickory Grove Missionary Baptist Church, 3504 Hartsville Pike, Castalian Springs’ Annual Homecoming Service is at 11 a.m. message will be delivered by Reverend Thomas O. Staten, Pastor of Hickory Grove Baptist Church. 3 p.m. guest will be Pastor B. L. Chandler and the congregation from Parkers Chapel Baptist Church, Portland. Dinner will be served. Everyone is welcome.
July 18
Be a part of a live studio audience featuring:   Jason Crabb, The Bowlings, Triumphant,  The Martins, Karen Peck and New River, Legacy Five, The Nelons, Jeff and Sheri Easter, The Hoppers. Show begins at 7 PM, doors open at 6 p.m. There are 1,500 free seats at Trinity Music City, 1 Music Village Blvd. Hendersonville. For More information: 822-8333
July 22, 23
Class of 1986 Reunion Schedule: July 22,7 p.m. until ?,Whippoorwill, formerly Swaney Swift Drugs. July 23, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., covered shelter in the back of Triple Creek Park. Bring your family, lawn chairs and picnic lunch. This is a free event for all. The main event: July 23, 6 pm until ? Hampton Inn, Gallatin. $50 per person/$100 per couple.Rooms will be available for $84 plus tax. Call 206-9595 for reservations. Chef Christopher is catering the event. Checks will be accepted  and need to be mailed to GHS CLASS OF 1986,  1010 BROOKWOOD DRIVE GALLATIN TN 37066. Or you can bring by your payment to the Hampton Inn in Gallatin. Call Mary 330-1952, Michele 351-7501 or Annette 483-9625 or 206-9595--Annette is our contact person at the Hampton Inn.
FYI
Thrifty Paw is now open at 222 Fairgrounds Road (Behind the Post Office). Hours are Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 8:00 a.m.– 2:00 p.m. Proceeds benefit Sumner Spay Neuter Alliance (“Low Cost” Spay Neuter Clinic). Furniture, household & childrens items, books, CD’s, and more good stuff. They will gladly accept your unwanted items. Contact Beckie, 210-3296 to arrange a pickup.

A Support group for Parkinsons patients and spouses/caregivers meets at The Blackeyed Pea restaurant in Hendersonville the first Monday of every month at 6 p.m.

Alzheimer’s Support Group meets the first Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at Elmcroft of Hendersonville, 1020 Carrington Place, 264-2440.

Sertoma
of Gallatin has a drop off box at the Gallatin Senior Citizens Center on Franklin St. near the square for anyone who would like to donate a used hearing aid to be given to HEAR Nashville to refurbish and provide hearing for someone who cannot afford a hearing aid on their own.

FARMERS MARKET
is open Monday through Friday 10 to 6 and Saturdays 7 to 12. A variety of homemade breads and jellies, landscaping items/plants, vegetables and flowers are available. On Facebook, go to Gallatin Farmers Market and ‘like’ it and you will be notified weekly as items change at the market or call 452-5692 to get registered.

Peach Valley Baptist Church
, 508 Peach Valley Road, has a “NEW” 8 a.m. service each Sunday.

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June 29, 2010
Dear Editor;
Citizens and friends of Sumner County,
The heritage and natural beauty of Castalian Springs is about to face its biggest threat yet.
The quality of life will forever be changed for area residents if the Hoover Quarry Company is allowed to proceed with its plan to establish a quarry, two asphalt plants, two cement plants and a rock crusher plant on the farmland in the Corum Hill Road area and the Old Highway 25 area of Castalian Springs.
This complex will be within historical land trust monuments such as Bledsoe Lick Historical Park, General Bate’s home, The Parker Cabin, The Rogan Irish Stone Cabin, The Bledsoe Cemetery, Wynnewood and the Indian burial mound sight. All will be neighbors with The Hoover Quarry Company industrial complex.
The state and federal government are in the process of spending approximately six million dollars to reconstruct Wynnewood from tornado damage sustained three years ago. The state recently acquired the General Bate’s home; both homes are within less than 1000 yards of the industrial sights.
This planned industrial development will decimate a large area of land and produce chemical bi-products that will infiltrate the life, habitat, and historic buildings of an area known for its productive farmland and peaceful way of life.
When my late husband, Tom Mabrey helped established the Bledsoe Lick Historical Park, he envisioned a place of beauty and tranquility where people could enjoy the out of doors and a sense of history and time.
Let us stand together to preserve the historical significance of this area and to protect the ecological environment of Castalian Springs. Please speak up!
In Tom Mabrey’s own words, “Will they be children lost in time and space.
No history...no special place.
Few there are who understand...
Yesterday was once tomorrow’s plan.”
Respectfully,
Carrie D. Mabrey
Gallatin

       
Dear Editor;

Yesterday evening I was enjoying the calm and serenity that has been present in Historic Castalian Springs for a couple hundred years. Sitting on my patio I could hear the call of the evening doves, the croaks from the frogs at our pond ,and the gleeful chirping of  crickets. The soliloquy of the countryside will be replaced by the blasting of our beloved farmland shattering forever our skyline will flying rocks and dust.
 The smell of honeysuckles vines, wild roses, and apple blossoms replaced by the poisonous fumes from two asphalt plants and dust from two cement plants and a rock crusher. All from the GREED of Hoover, Inc. who has no regard for one of the most historic sites in all of Middle Tennessee and the 50 + landowners that adjoin the quarry-industrial complex.
 The state and the county own five historic homes in harms way, Wynnewood and the General Bates house are within a few hundred yards of the five dust spewing toxic fumes producing plants.
There can be no worse place in Middle Tennessee for this type operation, NONE!!
Tom Neal, Jr
Beautiful historic Castalian Springs

 
Dear Editor;
I was appalled by the news that Hoover, Inc. has acquired  400 acres of prime land in Castalian Springs with the intent to operate a quarry, rock crushing facility, asphalt and concrete plants.
Castalian Springs is the most beautiful and historic spot in beautiful Sumner County. To enter old Highway 25 and drive by Wynnewood and through the little village past the stone age Indian Mounds and Gov. Bate’s birthplace at Hawthorne Hill is to feel the real presence of Tennessee’s history - 14 centuries of it. Within two miles of the proposed site we find  Cragfont and Bledsoe Creek State Camping Park. The nearby Bledsoe Fort Park is the largest undeveloped pioneer fort site in Tennessee.The entire area is a major tourist attraction for those seeking the quiet refreshment of nature and a deeper understanding of our roots.  
Tennessee and the US Government are investing  millions of dollars in the restoration of tornado-damaged Wynnewood, less than seven-tenths of a mile from the quarry site, signaling their opinion of its value as an educational and tourist attraction.  The State has in the planning stage the further development of Bledsoe Park as a major park in its system.   
I have spent the last decade painting the beauty of this area and writing about its history. Open pit quarrying is dangerous, dirty and damaging to the environment and property values of an area, with noise, dust, rubble piles, air pollution and heavy trucks. Why should we allow this stealth attack on the beauty spot of Sumner County?
William Puryear
Gallatin


Dear Editor;
The Gallatin High School Class of 1991 wishes to thank everyone who helped make our 20 year reunion such a great success! Special thanks to Larrivierre’s, The Whipporwill, Gooch’s, Southside Bar & Grill, Beverly’s Boutique,  DJ Joe Fisher,  RSVP Catering and The Gallatin Country Club! A special thank you also goes to three lovely young ladies from the Class of 1992 and 1993 for volunteering to help out with registration so that everyone from our class was able to enjoy Saturday evening’s event. You all made our weekend of events fantastic! A very special thank you goes to all the Class of 1991 graduates! So many of you helped the reunion committee spread the word and your participation and attendance is truly what made our 20 year reunion the best it could possibly be! We look forward to seeing even more of you at our 30th!
GHS Class of 1991
20 Yr. Reunion Committee


Dear Editor;

Castalian Springs under attack.
There is a battle shaping up in Castalian Springs.  On one side are the residents of the small, sleepy town of Castalian Springs who value their peace and quiet and rural lifestyle.  On the other side is the large corporation of Hoover Inc. who want to place a rock quarry, cement plants, asphalt plants, and rock crushing facility on about 350 acres in the heart of the town, and near some of the most significant historical sites in the State, such as Wynnewood, Bledsoe’s Fort, and Bate’s house.  This project would destroy the quality of life in this town.  It will also make State Road 25 a traffic-clogged, dangerous road.  This project is totally wrong for this area, and I’m convinced, opposed to the Sumner County Comprehensive Plan and zoning regulations.   One would think it would never be approved, but the people behind the quarry have the money to hire the slick lawyers, and are motivated by large profits.  I only hope that residents of Castalian Springs can count on our Sumner County officials to do the right thing and give this project the boot.
John Simons
Castalian Springs

Dear Editor;

To: Outgoing Director of Schools Benny Bills and Incoming Director of Schools Del Phillips; School Principals Jewell McGhee, Robin Hood, Ahmed White and Frank Cardwell; School Board Members Tim Brewer, David Brown, Beth Cox, Andy Daniels, Will Duncan, Shannon Dunn, Glen Gregory, Danny Hale, Don Long, Vanessa Silkwood and Ted Wise; and The American Center for Law and Justice;
We are writing today to let you know of our full, unqualified support for your efforts in defending our schools and our right to local, self government from the lawsuit filed in federal court by the ACLU. We believe this lawsuit is completely without merit and view it as an unwanted intrusion into our community’s local policies, which are protected by the U.S. Constitution, not prohibited by the Constitution as this lawsuit claims.
Since the founding of our nation the people of America have been free to build the types of communities they believe are most likely to lead to their happiness and prosperity, with protections put in place by our nation’s Founders to prevent the national government from infringing on our rights.  Here in Sumner County we have built a remarkable community with warm and compassionate citizens, robust civic and church organizations, an acclaimed education system, vibrant and generous local businesses and responsible governance that has promoted prosperity and a high quality of life even in the midst of national recession.  We believe Sumner County is a community to be emulated and commended for the ways in which we live and conduct ourselves.
We believe the people of Sumner County are unfailingly tolerant, welcoming and respectful of the values and beliefs of our fellow citizens.  We do not believe expression of or exposure to religious faith, whether it be by students, teachers, school administrators or others is an act of offensiveness, intolerance or exclusion, and certainly is not a crime. Nor is the free exchange of ideas or interaction with people and places of faith a violation of the Constitution.
We believe that the right to determine the policies of our school system resides solely within our community and state. The atmosphere within our classrooms is best placed in the hands of our teachers and principals in cooperation with students and parents, then with school administration and finally with our elected school board.  It is healthy for us, as a community, to debate the policies of our schools.  When we have disagreements it is up to us to work out those disagreements to the best of our ability within our own community, not in front of a federal court.
We stand with you and thousands of our fellow citizens in defense of our community. We will be praying for your welfare, strength and success in confronting this lawsuit.  Your community is with you.
Sincerely,
135 leaders of the Sumner County community
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Durski accepts position with Tennessee Department of Education

Sumner County Schools Assistant Director of Finance Maryanne Durski has
accepted a position as the Executive Director of Local Finance with the State
Department of Education.  
 
Mrs. Durski submitted her resignation to Sumner County Director of Schools
Dr. Del R. Phillips III on Thursday morning.  
 
While I am excited personally for Mrs. Durski, this is a big loss for Sumner
County Schools, Dr. Phillips said. Mrs. Durski has a wealth of knowledge about
school finance that will not easily be replaced. She has been recognized by her
peers as the best school business official in Tennessee. Sumner County Schools
was fortunate to have her as a part of our team for the past 18 years.   
 
Mrs. Durski has served as the Assistant Director of Finance for the past 14
years and has been employed by Sumner County School for the past 18 years.  
 
My time with Sumner County Schools has been a time of tremendous
personal and professional growth. I have had the pleasure to work with our
wonderful administrators, teachers and support staff, Mrs. Durski said.  
 
In particular I have been privileged to work with what I consider the best
Finance Department in the State. It has been an honor to participate in the public
education process, and I look forward to continuing that work on a different
platform. The opportunity offered me at the State level is one that I cannot pass by,
and I know it is the right decision for my family and me.  
 
Dr. Phillps said he plans begin the process to identify a new Assistant
Director of Finance on Friday.   

 

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June 29, 2011
Billy W. Wright
age 73, of Cottontown, passed away Monday, June 27, 2011. Funeral service is today, Wednesday, June 29, at 11:00 a.m. from the chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home with Dr. Larry Yarborough officiating. Interment follows in Crestview Memorial Park with John Prosser, Tom Prosser, Bo Bowling, Chanc Bowling, Kenneth McCullough, Scott Carter and Erin Carter serving as pallbearers. Honorary pallbearers are Bud Coley, Bud Wilmore, Billy Wheeler, Paul Neal, Edward Beene, Lem Beene, Chris Templeton, Yamilleph Munoz and Roberto Munoz.  Remaining visitation is today from 9:00 a.m. until time of service. Mr. Wright was born December 4, 1937, in Gallatin, son of the late Jack and Edith Morris Wright. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by sisters, Bobbie Jean McCullough and Peggy Sullivan. He is survived by his wife, Ann Prosser Wright of Gallatin; two daughters, Christi Carter and husband Scott of Cottontown and Ellen Patterson of Bloomfield, IN; one brother, Jacky Wright of Nashville; three grandchildren, Abby Patterson, Trevor Patterson and Erin Carter; and one great grandchild, Will Gregory. Mr. Wright was affiliated with Jacky and Billy’s BBQ Junction, served in the U.S. Marines, was a member of First Baptist Church and a truck driver for Gallatin Portland Freight Line and Portland Express.  Memorials may be made to Special Riders of Sumner County, 412 Watt Nolan Road, Cottontown, TN  37048. Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com.
Christine B. Taylor
age 84, of Hendersonville, passed away Saturday, June 25, 2011. Funeral service was Tuesday, June 28, at 1:00 p.m. from the chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home, with Brother Jerry Peace officiating. Interment was in Crestview Memorial Park with family and friends serving as pallbearers. Mrs. Taylor was born June 9, 1927, in Carthage, daughter of the late James Campbell Butts and Ova Kelly Butts. In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by sister, Lorene Butts Johnson, and brother, J.L. Butts. She is survived by husband of 61 years, C. B. Taylor of Hendersonville; daughter Doris Ross and husband Kenneth of Goodlettsville; brothers Robert Butts and wife Edith and Joe Butts and wife Marilyn, all of Gallatin, and granddaughter, Betty Jean Ross of Millersville.  Mrs. Taylor worked at Genesco and Nasco Corp. Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com.
Inez Draper
age 88, of Gallatin, passed away Friday, June 24, 2011. Funeral service was Tuesday, June 28 at 11:00 a.m. from the chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home with Pastor Darrell Withers and Brother Jerry Russell officiating. Interment followed in Crestview Memorial Park with family and friends serving as pallbearers. Mrs. Draper was born on March 19, 1923, daughter of the late Leslie and Lucy Gregory Russell. In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by husband B. W. Draper, daughter Patricia Pryor, sister, Virginia Swallows, and nephew, Mark Russell. She is survived by brothers, Cortez Russell and wife Vera, and T. J. Russell, all of Lafayette; sister, Geneva Knight of Indianapolis, IN; granddaughter, Michelle Pryor of Gallatin; four great grandchildren, Mariah Bush, Miranda Banks, Lexus Harper, Heather East and husband, David; two great-great grandchildren and six nieces and nephews, Peggy Harper, Shelia Guenin and husband Pat, Don Swallows and wife Sandy, Rick Knight and wife Nancy, Kurt Knight and wife Joan, and Mike Russell; and 11 great nieces and nephews. Mrs. Draper was a member of Cedar Grove Missionary Baptist Church.  Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com.
Malcolm Steve Climer
age 65, of Gallatin, passed away Friday, June 24, 2011. Funeral service was Monday, June 27, at 1:00 p.m. from the chapel of Alexander Funeral Home with Brother Robert Dunn officiating. Burial followed in Crestview Memorial Park with Stewart Voss, Chad Griggs, Nathan Harding, Mike Lemley, Tobie Griffin and Randy Liles serving as pallbearers. Mr. Climer was born in Tipton County, TN on December 2, 1945, son of the late Harry Wilson Climer and Marjorie Armenta Beasley Climer. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by a brother, Harry W. Climer, Jr.  He is survived by his wife, Patricia Crumley Climer; one son, Chris Climer, both of Gallatin; one brother, Thomas A. Climer and wife Linda of Ripley, TN and two sisters, Margaret Whiticker and husband Bill of Gallatin and Linda Jo Shelton and husband Frank of Franklin, TN; and nieces and nephews. Online condolences may be submitted at alexanderfh.info.
Nancy Angeline Caldwell Blevins
age 60, of Lebanon, passed on Friday, June 24, 2011.She was born, February 7, 1951, in Mt. Vernon, IL, to the late John W. F. Caldwell and Dell A. Caldwell. She is survived by her husband, Jerry N. Blevins, and two sons, William Eric Blevins, Environmental Activist, and Spencer Nelson Blevins. She is also survived by two sisters, Lou and Joe Sappington (Leigh, John, Sarah & Courtney) of Franklin, TN, and Karen and Edwin Bills (Rachel & John) of Knoxville, TN. She graduated from E.W. Grove High School in Paris, TN, in 1969 and UT Knoxville in 1973, with a BA in Human Services. She graduated with her future husband from UT Medical Center, Memphis in March, 1976, with a BS in Pharmacy. Her favorite activity in life was being with family and friends. She loved to travel, quilt, watch the birds at her home sanctuary and prepare and partake of great food. Her love of life was complete and completely positive until her passing. At the end of her time here, she was “a messenger of the angels,” and her effect on the people she met was profound. Memorials may be made to Alive Hospice or the Nashville Rescue Mission. Visitation will be from 6-7 p.m. and her Memorial Celebration of Life at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 30, at Unity Church, 4319 Saundersville Rd, Old Hickory, TN, 615-847-7480.
Glair Mullins
passed away peacefully, Friday, June 17, 2011 at Alive Hospice Skyline Madison Campus. He was 83 years old.  A Celebration of his life was held Monday, June 20 at 10 a.m. with Pastor Jeremiah Smart officiating. He was born March 6, 1928 in Red Bush, KY in Johnson County to Oakie and Dessie Skaggs Mullins. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife of 44 years, Stella G. Mullins, and his brother, Carroll Mullins. He worked for more than 40 years as a welder and was a member of the Plumbers and Pipefitters Local #572. After his retirement he enjoyed growing a huge garden and giving most of it away to friends and family. He raised cattle and loved to hunt, especially deer and quail. He raised and trained his own bird dogs. He was a true craftsman who could build anything. He was a 10 year member of the Goodlettsville Saddle Club. The last 16 years, he had been a member of Highland Chapel Union Church. He is survived by his wife of 16 years, Joyce Hall Mullins; son, Dwight (Sharon) Mullins, Solgo Hachia, Arkansas; daughter, Kathy (Mike) Burris, White House; grandchildren, Brandon Burris and Stephanie Moss; great grandchild, Jacob Moss; brother, Redgel Mullins, Galena, OH; sisters, Eunice Adams, Marion, IN and Gloria (Ralph) Ferguson, Martha, KY. Serving as pallbearers were Mike Burris, Brandon Burris, Tommy Hoover, Rodney Hoover, Dennis Levering, Nick Levering, Ross Stoddard, and Ryan Stoddard. Honorary pallbearers, Jimmy Scott and Luther Lening. Final resting place is at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Goodlettsville. His family requests donations be made in his memory to “Alive Hospice, Madison Campus” in care of Austin & Bell Funeral Home, 2619 Hwy 41 South, Greenbrier, TN 37073.
Doris Lee Hudson
age 85, of Hendersonville, passed away June 22, 2011. She is preceded in death by parents, Ernest Lee and Mildred Goodwin Fusse; brother, William A. Fusse; husband, Theodore Hudson; She is survived by son, Stephen Gary Merrick; grandson, John Lee Merrick (Rebecca); devoted friends, Hazel Slate and Joi Wasill. A graveside service was held Saturday, June 25, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. at Hendersonville Memory Gardens with Dr. Doug Lepter officiating. Hendersonville Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
Dorothy Person
resident of Hendersonville, passed away quietly on May 19 after a long battle with Emphysema. She grew up in Gallatin where she lived until the early 40’s. From there she made her way to Washington, D.C.  After a brief stint in the private sector, she went to work in the foreign service of the U.S. Department of State at the Agency for International Development. She was well loved by her many colleagues and the friends she made during her career.  Her assignments took her to Libya, Nigeria, the Philippines and Nicaragua. She retired as a Foreign Service Personnel officer in 1975 to return to the States and raise her son Tony. They returned to Tennessee where she lived until her death. She leaves behind her son Tony, his wife Sherri, and two grandchildren, Za and Zion. If anyone feels he or she would like to remember her, please consider a donation (in memory of Dorothy Person) to Hendersonville Church of Christ Caring Hearts, located at 107 Rockland Rd, Hendersonville, TN, 37075. For more information about the Caring Hearts program, please contact David Draper at 615-330-0919.
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John Boyers' reception at Citizens Bank

By Marjorie Lloyd
Marjorie@thegallatinnews.com

John Boyers, a familiar presence in Gallatin’s banking history, was honored for his 55 years of service to the community last Friday at a reception at the new Citizens Bank building on East Main Street.

Family, friends and business associates gathered to pay tribute to the career of this man who has affected so many lives of the residents of Sumner County.

“We started this branch,” said Betty Sue Hibdon, president and CEO of Citizens Bank, “and John had a swollen leg and swollen knee and was in a brace, and he trudged in the building every day on matters of pipes and tarpaulins and whatever to make appointment times with people. … He started this thing, and we’ve not been disappointed a time since. I’ve grown closer to him. …

“He is one of the kindest, nicest men I have ever known. He is a joy to work with. Every employee here will attest to how wonderful he is, and we are going to miss him, but we hope there are better things in store for him, maybe fishing. Maybe Dean can find things for him to do around the house. … He was a true pleasure to work with.”

She made a presentation of a photograph by local photographer Richard Suter of the new pipe organ at the First Presbyterian Church where the Boyers are members and John serves as a trustee.

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Redistricting discussion begins

By Neal Siders
Neal@thegallatinnews.com

    The Sumner County Commissions Committee on Redistricting held its first meeting Monday June 27. While the meeting did not have any motions, Committee Chairman Merroll Hyde said that he would like to summarize population changes in order to allow members of the committee a preview of the upcoming decisions they will have ahead to make.

Redistricting is a constitutionally mandated process that coincides with the federal census, which takes place every 10 years, resulting in voting districts being realigned to reflect population change over time. When redistricting, population totals of each district are supposed to be equal within a five percent margin.

Hyde said that the committee only has to address a couple of commission districts, and fortunately four of the districts that require the most change border each other.

After looking at it, this may not be as difficult as I anticipated, said Hyde.

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Ott, Wheeler have final board meeting

By Corey Conley
Corey@thegallatinnews.com

    It was common knowledge that last weeks board meeting would likely be Assistant Director for Instruction Judy Wheelers final board meeting; however, it was the announcement of Assistant Director for Human Resources Craig Otts imminent departure which shocked the boardroom. Wheeler will be retiring after a 36-year career in Sumner Schools, but Ott will be moving to a high-level position within Metro City Schools Human Resource Department.

    It was Chairman Don Long who dropped the news. Its not just Mrs. Wheelers last board meeting, it is also Mr. Otts last board meeting with us, he said before thanking both for their work.

    Describing Wheeler as still in like Flynn, White Houses Ted Wise also thanked both of the departing Assistant Directors.

   You have made impressions on numerous young people, and I appreciate you. Youre leaving huge, huge holes to fill. You do your work everyday, and you do it diligently and you do it well.

    Board members Will Duncan and Glen Gregory also voiced their appreciation. Were going to miss both of you, said Duncan.

Theres no one who has given more to the Sumner County School system for the last 10 to 12 years than Judy Wheeler, said Gregory. Mr. Ott, I dont know why youre leaving.

   

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Face-off with a quarry

By Marjorie Lloyd
Marjorie@thegallatinnews.com

John and Allyson Simons could have lived anywhere in the United States when they decided to make their retirement dream a reality. They chose Castalian Springs, Tennessee, because it is horse country, and the rolling hills and historical sites, such as Wynnewood, Cragfont, and Bledsoes Fort Park, appeal to them.

We came into riding late in our lives after we retired, said Allyson. We got into horses. We researched where to live and moved out here because we thought it was perfect for horses and a peaceful, nice place.

John added, We spent a lot of time on the computer, even (looked at) Washington State. We put a lot of thought into it. Were real happy with this. This is the best home weve ever had.

The Simons are from Yorktown, Virginia. John, whose career was with the Environmental Protection Agency, and Allyson, a retired department head with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, have made quality of life an important part of their personal choices.

Both are diet-conscious, with emphasis on healthy foods, such as the fresh vegetables they have growing in their backyard.

Green beans, tomatoes, peppers and squash, said Allyson, relating her current crop, but she admitted that she is concerned about squash borers.

Both enjoy being outdoors and especially sailing on ocean-cruising boats, something which they enjoyed doing for many years until the physical requirements became too demanding.

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June 29,2011
July 2
The Gallatin Senior Center is holding an Independence Day dance featuring the Southern Country Band. A Pot luck dinner will be held from 6 – 7 p.m. Please bring dinner style dishes. Tea, punch, coffee and desserts will be furnished by the center. Music and dance from 7 ‘til 10 p.m. All ages are invited and welcome. A donation of $5 per person, $7.50 per couple is suggested.
July 3
The public is invited to share in Rome Missionary Baptist Church’s Homecoming Worship Service. Pastor Will A. Duncan will deliver the 11 a.m. message and Pastor James Thomas and Jefferson Street Missionary Baptist Church will be the 3 p.m. guests. The church is located at 1277 Avondale Road, Hendersonville.
July 4
The Department of Human Services is closed in observance of Independence Day.
July 4
Faces of Hope Children’s Therapy Center is hosting the Gallatin Municipal July 4th Festivities. Any organizations interested in vending at this event please call the office at  206-1176 and ask for Adam or Kathy, or visit the website at www.facesofhopetn.com for vending information.
July 6-August 10
Workshop on the basics of learning to Live Well with Chronic Medical Conditions is approximately 2.5 hours per week for six weeks, each Wednesday morning. All materials are provided. There is no fee for the workshop. The focus is on older adults with chronic conditions and on those who provide care for them. For more information and to register, call Marilyn Whalen, at the Greater Nashville Area Agency on Aging, 891-5864.  The sessions will be held at Volunteer State Community College and space will be limited.
July 9
“Under the Big Top” Vacation Bible School welcomes babies through Middle School at Union Chapel Church, 1125 College Street, Portland.

FYI


Thrifty Paw is now open at 222 Fairgrounds Road (Behind the Post Office). Hours are Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 8:00 a.m.– 2:00 p.m. Proceeds benefit Sumner Spay Neuter Alliance (“Low Cost” Spay Neuter Clinic). Furniture, household & childrens items, books, CD’s, and more good stuff. They will gladly accept your unwanted items. Contact Beckie, 210-3296 to arrange a pickup.

A Support group for Parkinsons patients and spouses/caregivers meets at The Blackeyed Pea restaurant in Hendersonville the first Monday of every month at 6 p.m.

Alzheimer’s Support Group meets the first Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at Elmcroft of Hendersonville, 1020 Carrington Place, 264-2440.

Sertoma of Gallatin has a drop off box at the Gallatin Senior Citizens Center on Franklin St. near the square for anyone who would like to donate a used hearing aid to be given to HEAR Nashville to refurbish and provide hearing for someone who cannot afford a hearing aid on their own.

FARMERS MARKET is open Monday through Friday 10 to 6 and Saturdays 7 to 12. Portland Strawberries, a variety of homemade breads and jellies, landscaping items/plants, tomato plants, pepper plants and flowers are available. On Facebook, go to Gallatin Farmers Market and ‘like’ it and you will be notified weekly as items change at the market or call 452-5692 to get registered. The daily fee is $10 but drops substantially if you pay by the week or month.

Peach Valley Baptist Church 508 Peach Valley Road, has a “NEW” 8 a.m. service each Sunday.

Gallatin Firefighter’s Association Golf Tournament is scheduled for September 28 at Long Hollow Golf Course. Registration is at 7 a.m. followed by an 8 a.m. Shotgun Start. Cost is $70/player, $280/team, 4-Person Scramble. Hole sponsorships are available for $100. Prize: $10,000 cash prize for 1st hold-in-one on hole four. Proceeds to benefit Phoenix Burn Camp, local charities and Fire Prevention Education. Call Ben Harris, 451-0840, Mark Hall, 452-8280 or Jeff Broadrick, 452-2159 for more information.
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June 20. 2011
Joe Thomas Hyre, Sr.
age 74, of Gallatin, passed away Wednesday, June 15, 2011. Funeral service was Saturday, June 18 at 2:00 p.m. from Hartsville Pike Church of Christ with Brother Brian Jarrett and Brother Doyle Farris officiating. Interment followed in Crestview Memorial Park with Joe Thomas Hyre, Jr., Jay White, Randy Bullock, Michael Grigsby, Allen Bennett and Steve Keith serving as pallbearers. Mr. Hyre was born in Wayne County, IN on October 10, 1936 son of the late Leon and Mildred Sipe Hyre. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Norma Hyre of Gallatin; children Tina Marie White and husband Jay of Nashville and Joe Thomas Hyre, Jr. of Gallatin; brothers Duane Hyre of Florida, Leon Hyre and wife Elsie of North Carolina and Clarence Hyre and wife Shirley of Indiana; sisters Mary Thurston and husband Slim of Florida and Susie Oakes and husband Norman of Indiana and grandchild Jessica Lynn Hardin and husband Christopher of Cross Plains. Mr. Hyre served in the U.S. Air Force and was a member of Hartsville Pike Church of Christ.  Memorials may be made to Heritage Christian University, P.O. Box HCU, Florence, AL  35630.  Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com. Family Heritage Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.
Leman E. Dillehay
age 89, of Gallatin, passed away Saturday, June 18, 2011. Funeral service was Tuesday, June 21 at 11:00 a.m. from the chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home with Brother Floyd Ferguson and Brother Shawn Sheppard officiating. Interment followed in Crestview Memorial Park with Charles Dillehay, Ricky Dillehay, Tim Smith, Tyler Hill, Logan Hill and Barry Perry serving as pallbearers. Mr. Dillehay was born July 31, 1921 in Defeated Creek, son of the late Charlie and Flora Kemp Dillehay. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by brother Roy Dillehay, sister Gladys Dillehay and grandson Mark Hill. He is survived by his wife of 70 years, Ruth Green Dillehay; daughter Sherral Hill and husband Jackie; sisters Josephine Carter and husband James and Lois McDonald and husband James; grandchildren Bo Hill and wife Andrea and Ginger Patterson and great grandchildren Tyler Hill, Logan Hill, Molly Hill and Peyton Patterson all of Gallatin. Mr. Dillehay  served in the U.S. Army during World War II, was wounded at Normandy and received a Purple Heart. He was a lifetime member of D.A.V., member of Defeated Creek Missionary Baptist Church and retired from General Electric. Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com.
Richard Ray “Rick” Rice

age 57, of Goodlettsville, was surrounded by his loving family when he went home to be with the Lord on June 15, 2011. Mr. Rice was a man of God, who was an inspiration to all who knew him. He was preceded in death by his fathers, Dennis Baker and Earl Rice. Survivors include his wife, Sunyi Rice; daughter, Joy (Aaron Boyd) Rice; son, Derrick (Bridget) Rice; mother, Virldean Baker; sisters, Debra (Jim) Hamilton, Lisa (Michael) Douchette, Rhonda McCutcheon, and Linda Burton; brothers, Danny (Kim) Rice, Chris Rice, and Craig (Heather) Rice; and their mother, Barbara Rice; several aunts, uncles, nieces, and nephews. A life celebration gathering was held on Monday, June 20th from 5-8 p.m. at Crestview Funeral Home. A graveside service wasbe held on Tuesday, June 21 at 10 am in Crestview Memory Gardens.
Timothy M. “Tim” Bell

age 53, of Bethpage, passed away June 17, 2011. Mr. Bell was preceded in death by his parents, Millard and Marjorie Bell, brother, Jonathan Bell and grandchild, Gracie JoLynn Ladd. He is survived by his wife, Connie Jo Bell; children, Brian M. Bell of Gallatin, Timothia M. Balentine (Jake) of Gallatin, Melissa M. Hall of Lafayette, Maranda M. Bell of Bethpage, Rebecca M. Bell of Lebanon, Tyler M. Bell of Bethpage, Matthew Porter of Murfreesboro, Joshua Porter (Mandy) of Gallatin, Brandi Ladd of Gallatin; 17 grandchildren; brother, William Bell (Barbara) of Ft. Myers, FL; sisters, Sheena Wilson and Cindy Bell both of Sydney, IN and brother, Thomas Bell of Bonita Springs, FL. Life Celebration service was Tuesday, June 21st at 6 p.m. from the Chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home with John McClendon officiating. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in his name at Volunteer State Bank. Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com.
Maggie L. Lee
age 81, of Gallatin passed away Friday, June 17, 2011. Funeral service was Monday, June 20 at 2:30 p.m. from the chapel of Alexander Funeral Home with Brother Darrell Braswell officiating.  Burial followed in Sumner Memorial Gardens with family and friends serving as pallbearers. Mrs. Lee was born in Hartsville December 11, 1929, daughter of the late Tom and Missy Brummett. In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by her husband, Glenn A. Lee, two brothers, Draper and Pete Brummett and one sister Susie Clark. She is survived by three sons, Richard Key and wife Sheila, of Gallatin, Terry Key and wife Dece of Satellite Beach, FL and Jeff Lee and wife Kristin of Gallatin;  one sister Ola Simpson of Bethpage; one brother Earl Brummett and wife Dorothy also of Bethpage; seven grandchildren, Brian Key and wife Tiffany, Michelle Robinson and husband Jake, Courtney McMahon and husband Larry, Morgan Lee, Tim Key, Chris Key, and Johnny Key and two step grandchildren, Jarod and Jason Osborne and three great grandchildren.  Online condolences may be submitted at alexanderfh.info.
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Instruction director, principals announced

By Corey Conley
Corey@thegallatinnews.com

Sumner County Director of Schools Dr. Del R. Phillips ended months of speculation on Monday when he announced Jennifer Brown as the new Assistant Director of Schools for Instruction. Brown replaces current Assistant Director Judy Wheeler, whose June 30 retirement marks the end of a 36-year career with the district.

While she may have large shoes to fill, Brown is no stranger to Sumner County. According to the announcement by Sumner schools, she began teaching at T.W. Hunter Middle in 1996. From there she rose to assistant principal at Portland Middle and Watt Hardison Elementary. After those and other supervisory roles, last year she served the district as the Instructional Coordinator for Accountability, EL, and Pre-K.

She has been a teacher, she has been an assistant principal, and she has worked to train teachers and administrators in how to be more effective. She has spearheaded programs that have helped make Sumner County Schools what they are today. I am very excited with all the possibilities she brings, said Phillips in the release. Phillips said he was drawn to her understanding of instruction and history of innovation.

Brown has a busy year ahead of her. The Assistant Director of Instruction is deeply involved with many of the day-to-day challenges teachers and principals  face. She is also pursuing a doctorate at David Lipscomb University. She has already earned a Masters Degree in Education from Trevecca Nazarene University.

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Mayor's Listening Tour at George's, June 27

Please join Mayor Jo Ann Graves at the next stop on her Mayor’s Listening Tour on Monday, June 27, at 5 p.m. at George’s Family Restaurant, 447 E. Broadway.

“Some of Gallatin’s most successful and important projects over the last few years grew out of ideas that came from our citizens,” Graves said.   

“Your ideas are important to me.  Your feedback helps formulate a future path for the city.  Please join me at one of the last two stops on my listening tour.  Let’s have a cup of coffee and talk.”

Four years ago, the mayor formed the Mayor’s Visioning Committee and held public meetings to collect ideas.  Then she sent out the Citizen Survey.  Last year, she met with citizens  one-on-one during Mayor’s Night In after hours in her office.  

This year, she is hosting Mondays with the Mayor Listening Tour.  

“All of these opportunities to hear from you have led to many important projects in Gallatin.  Among them, the South Water Avenue Revitalization project, Town Creek Greenway, rapid bus service to Nashville, added cultural events, improvements in energy efficiency, multiple road projects, and a new land use and development plan,” Graves explained.  “The City has improved processes because of your ideas.  We’ve created new tools for communication.  We’ve added more on-line options so you can do some of your city business from home.  

“The City has also been able to answer some of your individual concerns or issues and get your problems solved. I look forward to seeing you Monday.”

For more information, contact the Mayor’s office at 451-5961.  Or, email her at:  joann.graves@gallatin-tn.gov.

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School fees may be cut

By Corey Conley
Corey@thegallatinnews.com

PTO Committee Chair and Hendersonville school board member Vanessa Silkwood presented a plan to the Board of Education that would eliminate many school fees. This issue has been a longstanding complaint of parents and board members; many feel asking parents for the average base fee of over $65 per class per student is far too much for a free education.

   For Silkwood and other board members, it is unacceptable that fees and fundraisers are going to pay for things they consider necessities. Silkwood cited computers, software, library books, teachers assistants, copiers, playground equipment, and even permanent infrastructure improvements to board property.

 Of course the families that pay these fees already pay property taxes, noted Silkwood. I feel its our duty as a board to reduce these fees and the need for students to fundraise for their free public education.

Silkwoods plan broke down the difference between what the board already provides and what it would cost to pay the additional $65 per student fee. Because the board already provides $10 per student and pays the class fees for students on free and reduced lunch, it is currently paying the equivalent of $35 per student.

The PTO committees play would increase that allocation by $20 per student for next school year, and then by an additional $20 for the 2012-2013 school year. The suggested raise would add just over $500,000 to the budget, according to Silkwood.

 

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June 20. 2011

June 20-24
It’s Vacation Bible School time at Grace Baptist Church, located at 410 Old Hwy. 31E in Bethpage. Children age 3 through grade 12 are welcome from 6-9 p.m.  This year’s theme is “Big Apple Adventure - New York City.”  School will include worship, Bible study, music, missions, snacks, outdoor activities and crafts.  There will also be a family picnic on Saturday, from 6-8 p.m. at Flick Farm in Bethpage. If you have any questions, call Kim @ 452-2913.
June 22
Humane Society’s “Dining For Dogs’ event is 4 to 8 p.m. at the Barefoot Charlies restaurant, 125 Sanders Ferry Rd in Hendersonville. Portion of your food sale will benefit the Humane Society.
June 22-24
“Summer Revival” is 7 p.m. nightly at Peach Valley Baptist Church. Pastor C.A. Wimberly from Hunter Hill Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia is the guest speaker.
June 24, 25
Emeritus employees, residents and families will hold a yard sale to raise money for the Alzheimer’s Walk that will be in Nashville during October. The yard sale will be all day on Friday, June 24 and Saturday morning, June 25. Emeritus at Gallatin is located at 400 Hancock Street, at Hwy 109, across from Gateway Tire.
June 25
Descendants of William and Melissa Linder are invited to a family reunion from noon until 3 p.m. at the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Bring a covered dish. For more information call 931-761-0819 or email kathymaesummers@yahoo.com.
June 25
GHS Class of 1991 20 Year Reunion is from 6-11 p.m. at the Gallatin Country Club. If you or someone you know graduated from Gallatin High School in 1991 please make contact as soon as possible with one of the following Reunion Committee members: Nikki Thompson Michael, nikki@ghs1991.com; Carl Nelson, carl@ghs1991.com; Susan Willbanks Byrum, susan@ghs1991.com or 270-791-3460.
June 25
Trammel Lodge #436 annual Supper & Auction is at 4 p.m. with barbecue and potluck and an auction with donated items from the community to bid on.
June 25
Mt. Vernon School Reunion begins at noon at the Gallatin Civic Center. Bring a favorite dish to share. Call 452-3547 for more information.
June 25, 26
McMurry and Winston Family Reunion is at Rockland Recreational Center, Hendersonville, from noon until 7:30 p.m. with a Hawaiian Luau Family Picnic Saturday. Bring a favorite dish and lawn chair. Sunday there is a family banquet at the Gallatin Civic Center from 1 to 5 p.m. Family registration fee is $10. Bring a large covered dish to share. Contact Jessie Austin at 452-2077 or Donna Turner at 481-2536 for more information.
June 27
Mayor Jo Ann Graves will hold the next Listening Tour  at Georges’ Family Restaurant from 5-6 p.m. The restaurant is located at 447 E. Broadway.
June 27
This month’s open meeting for Sumner United for Responsible Government (SURG) is from 6:30 until 7:30.  at Cody’s Pub at 1201 Twelve Stones Crossing in Goodlettsville.A buffet table will be available to attendees, which includes salad, entrees, sides, and drinks, for $9.95. The guest speaker is U.S. Representative Diane Black (R) of Gallatin.
July 2
The Gallatin Senior Center is holding an Independence Day dance featuring the Southern Country Band. A Pot luck dinner will be held from 6 – 7 p.m. Please bring dinner style dishes. Tea, punch, coffee and desserts will be furnished by the center. Music and dance from 7 ‘til 10 p.m. All ages are invited and welcome. A donation of $5 per person, $7.50 per couple is suggested.
July 6-August 10
Workshop on the basics of learning to Live Well with Chronic Medical Conditions is approximately 2.5 hours per week for six weeks, each Wednesday morning. All materials are provided. There is no fee for the workshop. The focus is on older adults with chronic conditions and on those who provide care for them. For more information and to register, call Marilyn Whalen, at the Greater Nashville Area Agency on Aging, 891-5864.  The sessions will be held at Volunteer State Community College and space will be limited.

FYI
Thrifty Paw is now open at 222 Fairgrounds Road (Behind the Post Office). Hours are Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 8:00 a.m.– 2:00 p.m. Proceeds benefit Sumner Spay Neuter Alliance (“Low Cost” Spay Neuter Clinic). Furniture, household & childrens items, books, CD’s, and more good stuff. They will gladly accept your unwanted items. Contact Beckie, 210-3296 to arrange a pickup.

A Support group for Parkinsons patients and spouses/caregivers meets at The Blackeyed Pea restaurant in Hendersonville the first Monday of every month at 6 p.m.

Alzheimer’s Support Group meets the first Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at Elmcroft of Hendersonville, 1020 Carrington Place, 264-2440.

Faces of Hope Children’s Therapy Center is hosting the Gallatin Municipal July 4th Festivities. Any organizations interested in vending at this event please call the office at 615-206-1176 and ask for Adam or Kathy, or visit the website at www.facesofhopetn.com for vending information.

Sertoma of Gallatin has a drop off box at the Gallatin Senior Citizens Center on Franklin St. near the square for anyone who would like to donate a used hearing aid to be given to HEAR Nashville to refurbish and provide hearing for someone who cannot afford a hearing aid on their own.

FARMERS MARKET is open Monday through Friday 10 to 6 and Saturdays 7 to 12. Portland Strawberries, a variety of homemade breads and jellies, landscaping items/plants, tomato plants, pepper plants and flowers are available. On Facebook, go to Gallatin Farmers Market and ‘like’ it and you will be notified weekly as items change at the market or call 452-5692 to get registered. The daily fee is $10 but drops substantially if you pay by the week or month.

Need entries for Independence Day Parade Saturday, July 2 in Hartsville. No entry fee-Start at 10 a.m. at Industrial Park-Theme is Patriotic-Antique Cars, floats,and marching bands/groups, etc-Contact Mark Presley  (374-1010) or Mark White (202-9752) by Monday, June 27.

Peach Valley Baptist Church 508 Peach Valley Road, has a “NEW” 8 a.m. service each Sunday.

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Chuck Lindi's 'Rock Box' plays all the hits, all the time

For The Gallatin Newspaper

What do you do when you spent half your life in the broadcasting and entertainment business, and you have a massive record collection at your disposal?  If you’re a former DJ, you share the music online with an internet radio station.  Lifelong Gallatin resident Pat Julian, who goes by the air name “Chuck Lundi,” has done exactly that with “Chuck Lundi’s Rock Box.”  Live every Friday night from 6 p.m. until midnight, Chuck plays the greatest hits of all time with his extensive 4,000 song play list.  “When I decided to do this, I did not want to play the ‘same old songs’ that 99 percent of  ‘oldie’ type radio stations play,” he said. “I was very fortunate to work with some of the best in radio and entertainment from 1971 until 1993, and there are far more than the usual 300 song play list that is formatted on OTA (over the air) stations”.    

Chuck is quick to credit longtime friends Jack Hunter, Bill Buntin, and Jack Williams with giving him the opportunity to hone his skills, when he was hired as a Sunday morning announcer at WHIN back in 1971.

“My first duties were to sign on, on Sundays and operate the station for all the local ministers who would do a Sunday sermon, either live or on tape. Sundays started at 7 a.m., and the church programming went until 11:45, which gave me 15 minutes to play some rock until I left at noon for the afternoon DJ.  Gradually, Bill and Jack felt it was safe enough to let me work more weekend hours, and they were very patient as I learned the 'do’s and don’t’s’ of radio. I made a lot of mistakes, and got more than a few phone calls from Program Director Jack Hunter and Bill when I was on the air. It was the most fun I ever had working in radio.”    

Chuck went on to work at WHIN AM & FM, WQSI (where he was voted one of the top disc jockeys in the country in 1983), WAMG, and WLAC before he left broadcasting. “It finally got to the point where it was just not fun anymore, so I got out when I had other options presented to me.” Fast forward to 2010 when he was surfing around listening to internet radio stations, only to find they are all playing the same 300 songs over and over. “I knew there’s a better way to do this,” he said. By doing tons of research, he found an online server that was able to handle the large bandwidth that was required to do his show. So, with the equipment he had collected over the years as a DJ and live musician (he plays bass, guitar, and  drums), he debuted his show to one listener, longtime friend Bob Watson, who lives in Alaska. “I emailed Bob and said ‘Hey, listen to this and tell me how it sounds.’”  

Soon I posted the details of the show on Facebook, and the audience began to grow, first with friends and classmates from  Gallatin High, then in the last year alone, over 7000  local area listeners have tuned into the “Rock Box” either live on Friday nights or listened to the archived shows that are updated every week.    

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Six keep '81 Act in county

By Neil Siders
Neil@thegallatinnews.com

Six members of the Sumner County Commission voted to uphold the recently enacted 1981 Financial Management Act during their Monday, June 20 meeting. A majority, 13, voted to rescind the Act, but the vote required 16 to pass and thus failed.

The six who voted against the repeal were Commissioners Merrol Hyde (District 8), who spearheaded the adoption of the Act, though he opposed it in the past, Frank Freels (District 4), Kirk Moser (District 7), Jim Vaughn (District 6), Steve Graves (District 3), and Billy Geminden (District 2), with Commissioner Jo Skidmore present, but not voting on the issue.

Commissioners Moe Taylor (District 1), Jerry Stone (District 11), Paul Freels (District 11), and Bob Pospicil (District 12) were absent during the meeting. Stone, Freels and Pospicil were attending an E911 conference out of state, along with County Executive Anthony Holt. Taylor was home  ill.  

During the debate on the issue of repealing the 81 Act, Commissioner David Kimbrough said he would like to propose an amendment to the resolution to repeal the Act, an amendment that he proposed during the last Financial Management Implementation Committee meeting, on which he serves. The amendment had been scheduled to appear with the resolution, but was not included on the version presented on Mondays agenda. If the commission would vote to repeal the act, Kimbrough stated, the commission would create a committee to investigate generating a private financial management act that would benefit all parties involved and be tailored to fit Sumner County, which is larger and has more schools that any of the 19 counties currently on the Act.

Kimbroughs amendment passed.

 

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June 15, 2010
Estelle Brown
age 100, of Gallatin passed away Saturday, June 11, 2011. Funeral service was Tuesday, June 14 at 2:00 p.m. from the chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home with Brother Kenneth Woodall officiating. Interment followed in Rock Bridge Cemetery with family and friends serving as pallbearers. Ms. Brown was born in Sumner County, daughter of the late Alford Follis Brown and Pearl Ester Crowder Brown. In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by sisters, Audrey Suddarth, Erma Wilkes, Evelyn Galbraith and Ruby Anderson.  She is survived by one sister, Mary Agnes Webb of Gallatin and several nieces and nephews. Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com.
Evelyn Denning Emery
age 78, of Castalian Springs, passed away June 9, 2011. She was preceded in death by her husband, Winder Emery; two brothers, Kemp Denning, Jr. and Tom Denning and parents Kemp H. Denning and Ruth Durham Denning. She is survived by her daughter, Angela (Paul) Bosch of Castalian Springs; two granddaughters, Heather Hall and Brittney Haller; one grandson, Adam Haller, all of Hendersonville; three great-granddaughters; a sister-in-law, Janet Denning; one niece and three nephews. Funeral services were conducted on Sunday, June 12 at 1:00 p.m. from the Chapel of Crestview Funeral Home with Pastor Gary Ferrell officiating. Entombment followed in Crestview Memory Gardens Mausoleum.
Jacob Neil Ramsey
age 25, of Gallatin, passed away Wednesday, June 8, 2011. Graveside service was Saturday, June 11 at 4:00 from Keytown Cemetery with Bishop Michael E. Clarke officiating. Jacob was born June 14, 1985 in Hendersonville. He is survived by his mother, Lisa Ramsey of Gallatin; father Danny Ramsey of Gallatin; son Kyson Vaughn of Lafayette; grandmother Faye Galbraith of Gallatin; grandfather Marion Galbraith, Jr. of Ridgetop; brother Ricky Joe Ramsey of Gallatin and sister Ashley Ramsey of Gallatin.  Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com. Family Heritage Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
James W. “Jimmy” Isenberg
age 69, of Gallatin, passed away Saturday June 11, 2011. The family held a private service on the day he passed away. Jimmy was born October 9, 1941 in Louisville, KY, son of the late Charles and Lola Elizabeth McWhirter Isenberg.  Jimmy is survived by son, Jonathan Isenberg of Gallatin; daughter Mary Isenberg of Cottontown; brothers Albert E. Isenberg and wife Josie of Hendersonville, Charles “Skeeter” Isenberg and wife Peggy of Cuba, KY, Gene Walker and wife Wanda of Kentucky and Jack Isenberg and wife Sandy of New Orleans, LA; sister Pat Fonte and husband Phil of Slidell, LA; grandchildren Charlene Mishell Isenberg, Todd Jeffery Isenberg and Jamie Lynn Isenberg and lifelong friend Paul W. Neal of Gallatin. Jimmy served in U.S. Army during Vietnam and was a teacher with the Sumner County School System. Memorials may be made to American Cancer Society.  Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com. Family Heritage Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.
Patricia Lois Jackson
age 64, of Antioch, passed away June 5, 2011. She is survived by her daughters, Katherine Smith and Kellye Denise Lungo; grandchildren, Patrick Smith, Brandon Lungo and Ashley Lungo; great-grandson, Ashley Lungo and brothers, Howard Carney and Bobby Carney. According to her wishes Ms. Jackson will be cremated. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, June 18 at 10:30 a.m. at Hickory Hollow Towers, 100 Curtis Hollow Road, Anitoch. Arrangements entrusted to Crestview Funeral Home and Memory Gardens, 452-1943, www.crestviewfh.com.
Rulene Dyer Gregory
age 82, of Gallatin, passed away Monday, June 13, 2011. Funeral service is today, Wednesday June 15, at 2:00 p.m. from Landmark Missionary Baptist Church with Brother Dennis Young, Brother Frank Kirby and Brother Kenneth Daughtry officiating. Interment is in Crestview Memorial Park with family serving as pallbearers. Remaining visitation is today from 10:00 a.m. until time to leave for the church.  Mrs. Gregory was born May 3, 1929 in Lafayette, daughter of the late Ike and Minnie Freeman Dyer.  In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by husband Bobby Gregory, an infant baby girl, two brothers and one sister. She is survived by children, Cathie Troutt and husband Hollis of Gallatin, Donnie Gregory and wife Geri of Hartsville and Annie Daughtry and husband Kenneth of Gallatin; sisters-in-law, Sue Dyer of Lafayette and Mary Dyer of Missouri; brother-in-law Gary Gregory of Burns; 11 grandchildren, 22 great grandchildren and four great-great grandchildren. Mrs. Gregory was saved at age 12 and was a member, and the last charter member, of Landmark Missionary Baptist Church.  Online condolences may be submitted at familyheritagefh.com. Family Heritage Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.
Albert C. Winchester
age 74, passed on May 13, 2011 in Atlanta, Georgia. Albert was born in Gallatin, but lived in Chicago for many years. He was laid to rest at the National Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Caton, Georgia with full military honors. Courtesy of Smith Brothers Funeral Directors, Inc., 706 Monroe St.,www.smithbrothersfd.com.
Mary Alyce Pope Benford
age 88, of Nashville, is a former employee of Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Visitation is Thursday, 4 to 7 p.m. at Johnson & coleman Funeral Home. Visitation is Friday, 6 to 7 p.m. with service to follow at Hart Street Church of Christ, 13 Hart Street, Nashville. Brother Amanzo Jones will officiate. Committal and internment at Middle Tennessee State Veteran’s Cemetery in Pegram. Survivors are her brother, James (Rebecca) Pope; son, Clarence Marcus Benford; grandsons, Shawn (Kim) Dromgoole, Jay Mrrell, Justin Strachan, Marcus Keith Benford; granddaughters, Meika (Kelvin) McClendon, Kesia Benford, Brenda McCarroll Benford; four great grandchildren; other nephews; cousins; friends and devoted church family. She is preceded in death by her husband, Clarence L. Benford, daughters Jennie Dromgoole and Brenda Strachan.
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One Stop Career Shop

Cover letters and resumes

By Mike Needel
Local Veterans Employment Representative Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Have you found that ideal job yet?  After you have done a personal skills assessment and researched that career you have an interest in, you are convinced that this job is perfect for you.  You are now ready to progress through the application process and start working.  However, you find that the company wants you to send in a resume and cover letter, as opposed to applying in person and your resume is old and out of date.  Maybe you don’t have one at all...so what do you do? 

You have to write an effective cover letter and resume that will get someone’s attention.  This is sometimes the only opportunity you have to make a first impression and your resume is your introduction to the employer.  (We will talk about the interview later, but we have to get you to the interview first.) 

If your cover letter and resume are sloppy or filled with misspellings and grammatical errors, the impression you give is of a person who does not pay attention to detail, this could also be a reflection of how you will work.  However, if they are neat, concise and professional the employer will have a positive first impression of you and give your resume a more thorough reading.

A cover letter is a self-introduction that is a summary of your skills and experience relating to the job you are applying for.  It should be a short self promotion and describe how you can be a benefit to the company.  There is a lot of discussion about cover letters and whether they are needed.  My suggestion is that you have one ready, but only submit it if requested.

Your resume, on the other hand, is the best opportunity for you to highlight your experience and accomplishments.  It’s not just a chronological history of the previous jobs you have had; it’s a platform where you can get the employer interested in you as a real candidate to fill a company need.

There are several types of resumes that are currently used; however, I want to focus on only two of them: a “Chronological” resume and a “Functional” resume. 

A chronological resume is the historical listing of all the jobs you have had starting from the most recent and working backwards.  It’s straightforward and should include all the skills and tasks that you have accomplished in each position.

For other job seekers who have had several jobs in their lifetime, a functional resume is the one that I suggest to use.  It highlights your skills and experiences up front and shows how they relate to the job you are applying for.  If an employer spends more than 15 or 20 seconds reading your resume and still can’t figure out why you are qualified for the position, they will more than likely discard it.  With a functional resume the employer can immediately see why you would be a great fit for the company.  Remember, a resume is designed to do one thing...and that is to get you a face to face interview with a real person.  The sooner you can get an employers’ attention and create an interest in you, the better the chances are that you will get called in for that interview.

  Your resume should also include “Key Words” that come directly from the employers’ job description.  Sometimes companies will have a computer scan resumes to search for these key words and if they do not find any your resume will be discarded before a person ever looks at it.          

  As a final note, do not lie or misrepresent yourself on your resume.  If you get caught, it will show the employer that you are willing to compromise your honesty and may indicate that you might not be trustworthy.

  There are many tools out there that can assist you with your cover letter and resume. You can Google “Resume Styles” on the internet or you can come into the Career Center and get help with putting an effective resume together.  The Career Center has an excellent pamphlet called “Marketing your Job Talents” which is another free resource. 

  Remember, this is your first opportunity to introduce yourself to a perspective employer and your resume and cover letter are a direct reflection of you as a professional and as a person.

 I’ll talk about the actual interview next time. 


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Director of Schools begins first week

By Corey Conley
Corey@thegallatinnews.com

   “It’s been busy,” admits Dr. Del R. Phillips, “but it’s been a good kind of busy.”

   Phillips and his wife Amy are hard at work unpacking in their new home, and Phillips started his new job this week. It pays $178,500, offers plenty of bonus potential, and puts him in charge of thousands of Sumner’s teachers, principals, and hourly staff as the county’s newest Director of Schools.

    “You want it to all get in the right place and in the correct drawers, but it takes a few days to get everything in order,” says Phillips of his big move, which starting this Monday takes a back seat to the director’s chair.

    He says he and his wife are eager to get settled in.

 “We’ve not met a person who’s said anything except that this is a great place to live. We couldn’t be more excited about the opportunity to live here.”

    The first weeks for any new job are usually packed, and with thousands of employees and a nearly $200 million budget, the director’s chair is no exception.

“It will be really crowded,” says Phillips, who will have precious little time to orient himself before stepping right in where previous Director Benny Bills left off.

    His first days were filled with meetings with his administrative assistant Linda Bradley and other central office staff, most of whom he met for the first time.

Today he will attend Sumner County’s annual administrative retreat to meet with principals and assistant principals.

    Phillips was the ultimate selection from a lengthy hiring process, which subjected each candidate to multiple rounds of vetting, meetings, and interviews.

 Starting Tuesday, Phillips will go through the hiring process all over again as he interviews potential principals and replacements for Assistant Director Judy Wheeler, who retires June 30.

Phillips says he is no stranger to interviewing for leadership positions, but he’s glad the process includes other voices.

“You have folks in the room other than me. Be able to get a lot of good impact from people who are involved in the school. I’ll have lots of information beyond my own opinion before I make a decision.”

    For Phillips, facts and information are key to his leadership style.

“That’s what this whole first year is going to be about; it’s going to be about listening and developing a plan of what Sumner County wants to happen to their schools.”

    The point that he will be working with the community, rather than dictating changes, is one he wants to emphasize.

    “A lot of times, people think that a new leader of a community based organization is going to come there, and they’re going to do things to the community.

“Everybody asks, ‘What are you going to do to Sumner County?’ Well, I’m not going to do anything to you, I’m going to do things with you.

“That’s not the way leadership works. I’m going to listen to what you want to happen to your schools - parents, teachers, students, business leaders, and that’s what I’m going to do.”

    At his previous post as Director of Columbus, Mississippi’s schools, Phillips made dramatic changes to the district. He implemented looser zoning regulations, grew enrollment for the shrinking district with an aggressive marketing campaign, and cut costs by outsourcing food service and transportation.

    These and other moves concern some residents, but Phillips assures he has no grand plans in mind.

“I think it’s dangerous when a leader comes in with a preconceived idea one way or the other,” he says. “It skews your .bility to lead.”

    With both Bills and Wheeler leaving, the school system is losing decades of knowledge in just a few weeks’ time.

Phillips says he’s never met either of them, but, speaking of Wheeler, he says, “Any time you lose a person of her caliber, that has so much knowledge about the system, it’s a tremendous blow. Certainly her leaving there’s a lot of information that she’ll take with her that will be important for me to know.”

   Bills has already extended an offer to help says Phillips, and he hopes he can still call upon Wheeler in case he has questions about the district’s past.

    Although specific plans for Sumner County will depend on meetings with community members, he hopes to bring real, significant improvements to the system.

“Any system, if you’re moving forward, you’re never satisfied. We’re always looking forward to make the system work for the students.”

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