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Blessing of the Animals

By Marjorie Lloyd

Among God’s creatures two, the dog and the guitar, have taken all the sizes and all the shapes, in order not to be separated from the man.
    –Andrés Segovia

The annual Blessing of the Animals, sponsored by the Sumner Regional Helath Systems Volunteer Services Department, was held last weekend. From therapy dogs to just plain pets, animals of “all the sizes and all the shapes” came with their friends to remind us of the kinship of all of God’s creatures.

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Guilty -- but not of murder

By Candy Webb

thegallatinnews@bellsouth.net


David Smotherman, the 29 year old Hendersonville man charged with first degree murder after brutally killing Gallatin resident Sam Clark, 42, in a Hendersonville bar last year, has been found guilty by a jury of reckless homicide, which carries a sentencing range of 2-4 years.

“How is this justice?” wondered Clark’s widow Donna shortly after the verdict was read. “So you can get mad, kill someone and get away with it now?” 

Smotherman’s Nashville-based attorney, Rob McKinney, chose to take the case to a jury trial with the hope of getting a conviction for something less than first-degree murder, which carries a life sentence. He and his client never denied the killing -- or the brutality of the killing. They instead based the entire defense on a claim by Smotherman’s wife, Jessica, that Clark had forcibly tried to kiss her in the bar that night and grabbed her breasts, and when she told Smotherman about it outside, he went into a rage, re-entered the bar and killed Clark by smashing his head on a bar table until the table broke and then beating Clark’s head into the concrete floor. Pleading not guilty

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Coming Events

October 24

Sumner Regional Health Systems (SRHS) is hosting the third annual Souper Bowls Luncheon, which benefits Vena Stuart Elementary in Gallatin. The event is from 11:00 a.m. until 1:30 p.m., on the first floor of the parking garage at Sumner Regional Medical Center. Sumner Regional is the COMPASS partner for Vena Stuart and hosts the event as a fundraiser to support the local elementary school. In its third year, the event features delicious soups and chili prepared by local restaurants and organizations. A $10 meal ticket includes all-you-can-eat soup, bread, dessert, a drink and a pick of one of the ceramic bowls to take home. Each bowl is a one-of-a-kind masterpiece created by a Vena Stuart student.

October 25

The Community Garden at Volunteer State Community College is designed for the public as a place of education, beauty and fun. The college is holding a Community Garden work day from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. It’s a chance for volunteers to see what is being done and for people to get involved. Interested individuals should meet at the college greenhouse, located behind the Mattox Building, on the Vol State campus at 1480 Nashville Pike in Gallatin. Volunteers should wear appropriate work clothes and, if possible, bring gloves. For more information contact Jeff Kent at jeff.kent@volstate.edu

October 26-29

Grace Baptist Church at 410 Old Hwy 31E will host a revival with services at 6:30 nightly. Evangelist Terry Wilkerson will preach each night. There will be southern gospel music. For further information call 841-3020.

October 27

The Sumner County NAACP will hold its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. at Key United Methodist Church. All offices will be open for election. If interested in running for an office, call 451-9755 for more information.

October 28

Trunk or Treat, sponsored by Station Camp Church of Christ is from 6 to 8 p.m. at Station Camp Elementary parking lot at 1020 Bison Trail.

October 31

Douglass United Methodist Church at 2141 Long Hollow Pike is hosting a Fall Festival Trunk or Treat begin at 6 p.m. There will be a weiner roast, toasted marshmallows, games, candy and more.

October 31

The Gallatin Senior Citizens Center Halloween Ball is from 7 to 10 p.m. with music by “Classic Country”.  There is a potluck, door prizes, and costume contest. $5.00 single, $7.50 couple.

November 1

Gallatin First Church of Nazarene, 407 North Water Street  will host the JESUS Film, both in English and Spanish at 6 p.m. Please come and watch a film about the life of Christ based on the Gospel of Luke.  Contact  Barbara Fox, at 452-2101 for more information.

November 2

Sumner County Gospel Singing Convention will conduct its quarterly singing at 2:00 at the White Hill Missionary Baptist Church between Millersville and White House. In addition to normal congregational singing, the Young Fellowship youth choir will be singing. The church is located on Woody Lane, off Hwy. 31W. For directions, contact Steve Perrigo at 615-451-1302, or email  cperrigo@bellsouth.net.

November 5

About Books, UT Extension Book Club will meet at noon, at 155A East Main Street, to discuss “The Pillars of the Earth” by Ken Follett.

November 6

The Gallatin Business and Professional Women’s Club will meet at the Gallatin Department of Electricity on Jones Street at 6:30 for a Christmas Auction and social. For more information contact BPW president Sara Caldwell at caldwell008@comcast.net

November 7

There will be a gospel concert with Michael Combs at 7 p.m. at Smith County Ag Center in Carthage. Call (931) 256-0777 for more information.

November 8

Bledsoe Creek State Park will host Emergency Services Appreciation Day from 2 to 4 p.m. The public is invited to say thank you to the many police, fire, rangers and emergency people who put their lives on the line everyday. For more information, contact  Sharon Armistead at (615) 347-3639, skarmistead@yahoo.com

November 8

The 2008 Rotary Christmas for Kids Auction is at St. John Vianney’s Gym. This auction provides the funding for Christmas for Kids as well as helps with other local projects that the Gallatin Rotary Club does. Tickets for the event are $50 per couple. Email info@gallatinrotary.org for more information.

November 8

Music is the main event as seven bands take the stage for “Concert for a Cause” at Volunteer State Community College. The benefit fundraiser will help the Sumner County Humane Society and residents at the Pennington Place Retirement Center. Bands appearing include: Pineapple Explode, Phonoluxe, 16th State, His Name is Love, Since Forever, Singletree and Ladybug Landslide. Comedian Riley Fox will also perform. The event is being organized by students in Bonita Harold’s sociology classes at Vol State. The concert will take place outside on the Vol State campus at 1480 Nashville Pike in Gallatin, from 6 to 11 p.m. Admission is $5. Anyone bringing donations of blankets, pillows, soap, shampoo or other toiletries will receive $1 off admission. For more information call 615-230-3493.

November 8

Hope Family Health Services 2nd Annual Christmas Arts & Crafts Fair & Bake Sale is at the Macon County EMS building off Hwy 52 W in Lafayette, from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. They are currently taking donations of arts, crafts or any new items to sell at this event.  Volunteers, please contact us. All proceeds from this sale will go to help buy things for the  clinic to help with patient care.  Hope Clinic is a non-profit clinic. Call 644-2000, or just come out and shop.

November 9, 10, 11

The annual revival at Dry Fork Cumberland Presbyterian Church begins at 6:30 each evening.  There will be special music and song, along with The Reverend Denny Shephard preaching.  The church is located about ten miles north of Gallatin off Rock Bridge Road.  Look for the signs. Call 841-3169 or 230-8292 for more information.  

November 15

The first annual Gallatin Kiwanis Cub Bridge Tournament Session #1 begins at 1 p.m. at the Gallatin Civic Center. Session #2 begins at 6:30 p.m. Supper, catered by Chef Christopher,  will be provided between sessions.For more information and registration, call Toni Spears at 319-0290, or Trina Woodard at 478-7260. Registration forms must be in by November 1. Proceeds will be used to support Kiwanis children’s programs.

November 15

GHS Band Boosters is hosting their 5th Annual Dinner & Auction in the Gallatin High School Cafeteria. Spaghetti/Lasagna Dinner, catered by Larriviere’s on the Square, tickets are on sale now at GHS. Cost is $12 per person. Silent Auction: 4 p.m. – 6:55 p.m.; Live Auction: 7:00 p.m – ‘til; Dinner Served: 5  – 6:30 p.m. Dinner ticket is not required to attend the auction.

HIGH SCHOOL REUNIONS


Gallatin High School class of 1953 will have a reunion Saturday, November 1 at Cherokee Steak House. Visitors from other classes are welcome.For information call 452-7276, email bebebop@bellsouth.net or 826-8159, email kjgriggs@aol.com. Monthly get-togethers continue every third Monday of each month.

FYI


We want your junk!  Girl Scout Troop 1403 is preparing for their annual yard sale and is in need of donations. We will gladly take usable items of any kind or garage sale leftovers. Please call 644-3054 or email earthmother@nctc.com to arrange for pick up.


The Gallatin BPW  Club is having their annual pecan and walnut sale. The fundraiser raises money for their community service projects, along with funding a full scholarship for a VSCC student. For more information contact BPW president Sara Caldwell at caldwell008@comcast.net

 

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R-E-S-P-E-C-T!

By Marjorie Lloyd
mlgallatin@bellsouth.net

A lack of communication between two important bodies of the Sumner County School System created an uproar, culminating at the special called meeting of the Sumner County Board of Education, Tuesday, October 14, during which the validity of the teachers’ professional organization was reaffirmed.

Placards stating “Teachers deserve respect” were visible in the audience, and chants to Queen’s “We will rock you,” with words substituted, filled the lawn in front of the Sumner County School System office.

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Leadership Sumner will participate in Sumner Business EXPO

For The Gallatin Newspaper

 Drop by the booth of Leadership Sumner at Volunteer State Community College, October 9, 2008, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. to find out about this exciting program. Members of the Board of Directors and former graduates will be available to tell you about the many benefits.


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Letters to the Editor

Dear Editor;

As the election draws hear, people need to ask themselves: Can we survive another term like the last eight years? A war with no end in sight; a sinking economy?

McCain served his country with honor, for which he deserves our gratitude. However, that does not automatically make him presidential material. Grant was a great general, but made a lousy president. Do we want a man who is so rich and out of touch with reality as to think the U.S. economy is in great shape? Who is so wealthy, he doesn’t know how many houses he owns?

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Veer Left

GOP's hypocrisy makes local columnist's job easier

Coker tells it like it is for Sumner Republicans
Here’s something you don’t see too often–a Sumner Republican being forthcoming about his party’s agenda. Just days after Democrats were accused by a local Republican leader of injecting partisanship into nonpartisan races (more on that delicious and inaccurate irony later), newly-elected District 8 Constable Richard Coker was quoted saying that the reason he ran for the office was to “primarily, help the Republican Party. Just to help get the Republican name out and keep the government mainly in Republican hands.” While this sort of thinking is 

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State Supreme Court frees drunk driver

By Josh Nelson

jngallatin@bellsouth.net


The Tennessee Supreme Court last week issued a ruling on a case out of Sumner County, and effect of the ruling is that a driver who had a blood-alcohol content of .25 has gotten out of his third DUI charge.

On May 16, 2004, a Hendersonville Police officer was headed northbound on New Shackle Island Road when he a saw a vehicle coming in the opposite direction flashing its lights.

The driver of the vehicle with the flashing lights was waiving her arms and pointing t the vehicle traveling in front of her.

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Candidate forum to be held at The Palace

By Josh Nelson

jngalllatin@bellsouth.net


The Gallatin Fire Department Firefighters Union Local 4501, in conjunction with The Gallatin Newspaper and Greater Gallatin, will host a candidate forum October 16 at 7:00 p.m. at The Palace.

Participants are scheduled to include every candidate running for the City Council seats that are up for election and the County Executive candidates, and members of the public will be allowed to submit questions.

The candidates running for County Executive say they are all hearing similar concerns by the voters they have come in contact with while out on the campaign trail.

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Court rules it was legal for public housing residents to lie about income

By Josh Nelson

jngallatin@bellsouth.net


A Tennessee Court of Criminal Appeals has upheld a lower court’s ruling that three women who knowingly underreported their income when applying for public housing cannot be charged with theft of services.

The ruling was written by Judge David H. Welles, who was joined by both other judges on the three-judge panel, James Curwood Witt, Jr., and Robert W. Wedemeyer.

The allegations against the defendants, Monica Butler, Jessica Pickett, and Sheryl Ann Marshall, “…were that, during their respective tenancies (at housing owned by the Gallatin Housing Authority), they failed to report income to GHA in order to receive lower rental rates,” according to the ruling.

By the time Butler was charged for example, the state alleged that she owed $2,483 in retroactive rent.

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Dollars & $ense

“Don’t panic, but be cautious in every financial decision that you make.”
–David Wolfe, CFO, Volunteer State Bank

 By Marjorie Lloyd

marjorie@thegallatinnews.com

The Presidential race–who’s talking about that?


Instead, the majority of the media coverage, as well as the topic of informal conversations at the dinner table, the office and with strangers waiting in lines, is the financial crisis gripping the nation, while the world continues to watch the leadership of the free world.


Speaking of the leadership of the free world–exactly where is it?
 

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Coming Events

October 2

Key to the City  Club of Sumner County will host a benefit, “Celebrations!” - Tablescapes/Fashion Show by Coldwater Creek / Lunch / Market Place with vendor shopping at Country Hills Golf Club in Hendersonville. Doors open at 10:30 a.m. for shopping and lunch, catered by Movable Feast, Inc. at 11:30 a.m. Tickets, $25,  are available in advance by calling 812-6862. All proceeds from this event will go to HomeBound Meals, Gallatin Home Safe and Sumner County Humane society.

October  2

Have you ever thought about being a foster parent but just did not know how to get started or whether it was a good fit for you? Youth Villages would like to help you find the answers. Come and join us at 6:00 p.m. at the Portland Church of Christ located at 200 North Russel Street, Portland. Here you will receive information on our therapeutic foster care program, hear testimonials from current foster parents, and have a chance to win door prizes. Spaces are limited and you must RSVP. Contact Emily Moore at 615-250-7270 or at emily.moore@youthvillages.org for more information and to reserve your spot.

October 2

The Gallatin Business and Professional Women will meet at the Department of Electricity at 6:30 p.m. for the social, followed by a program at 7 p.m. Senator Diane Black and Representative Debra Maggart will speak. Contact BPW president Sara Caldwell at caldwell008@comcast.net for more information.

October 2

Tennessee Rehabilitation Center of Sumner County Open House will be from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at 1019 Union School Road. RSVP to 451-5826 ext. 10. All center staff will be available to give tours and answer questions.

October 2, 3, 4

Schedule for Gallatin Library closings during installation/training on new automation/circulation system: Closed today; Open tomorrow, 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.; Open Saturday, from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. No public internet access on any day this week.

October 2, 3, 4

Victory Chapel at 800 N. Broadway (109/TGT Rd) is having a flea market during Old Timers Weekend. Booths are available for $8-$15 a day depending on the size. Call Dyan Reynolds at 325-2433, Joyce Meadows at 325-4378 or Nesha Knight at 325-0672 for more details.

October 3, 4

The community is having a yard sale to help restore Durham’s Chapel Historic Roenwald School in Bethpage 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the community center at Old Hwy 31E #2.

October 2-5

Indian Hills Baptist Church at 901 Long Hollow Pike will host a revival 7 p.m. each night and 10:30 a.m. on Oct. 5 with Brother Terry Wilkerson officiating.

October 4

Half off sale at Goodwill starting at 8 a.m. Everything in the store is 50% off at 670 B Nashville Pike.

October 4

The First Annual Fun Day for Rainbow Early Intervention is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at College Heights Baptist Church. Parents for Rainbow is sponsoring the event that will feature activities and entertainment for all ages, as well as a silent auction. Rainbow is a non-profit program for children under three in Sumner County that have developmental difficulties, with the goal of helping them reach their full potential. For more information, contact Jeremy Desposito at 452-1054.

October 4

Lambuth Memorial United Methodist Church will sponsor the 1st Annual Benefit Motorcycle Run starting at 1 p.m. This year’s run will benefit the Rev. R. Clay Hall Trust Fund. Rev. Hall is a former Pastor at Lambuth who retired last year because of multiple health problems.   Entry fee per bike is $25.00.  Each rider is requested to further participate by securing donation pledges for miles ridden, participation, etc. Forms for listing pledges can be picked up at the church office at 1042 Hartsville Pike. The 2.5 hour ride will travel through Mt. Juliet and conclude with a post run party at Lambuth at approximately 5:00. For further information or to pre-register, contact the church office at 452-3715.

October 4

The Westmoreland Elementery School Fall Festival will be from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the school at 3012 Thompson Lane. There will be a live auction, Guitar Hero Contest, King and Queen Contest, Dance Revolution, country store and crafts, cake walk, hayrides, cart rides, etc.

October 4

The annual Candlelight Cemetery Tour at the Gallatin Cemetery, sponsored by the Sumner County Museum, is scheduled at 4 p.m. with continuous tours for groups through 10 p.m. Local actors will be presenting information about interesting people who are buried in the historic Gallatin Cemetery. The public is invited.

October 4

The Portland Masonic Lodge  #326 will host it’s annual fish fry at the fellowship hall behind the lodge at 505 Hwy 52E from 3 p.m. until the food runs out. $7 adults, $4 children under 12 years. Proceeds will support lodge charities and functions.

October 4

Safe Place for Animals  fundraiser/rummage sale is from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. at their new location at 243 West Eastland Avenue. Call Beckie at 452-9810 for more information.

October 6

The Sertoma Club will meet at the Icehouse at 375 Red River Road with a social at 6 p.m., dinner at 6:30 and meeting at 7:30. For more information call Larry Maynard at 452-1500.

October 6

The Station Camp High School Choral Department will present a formal concert 7:00 p.m. at Center Point Baptist Church in Hendersonville. The concert is free and will feature masterworks by Handel, Mozart, Rutter and others. For more information, please call 230-3185.

October 7

The Sumner County Democratic Party will be hosting a debate watch party at the historic Palace Theater in Gallatin. The debate will be shown live from Belmont University on the big screen.  Doors and concession stands open at 7 p.m. and the debate begins at 8 p.m. A $2 donation for admission is welcome. Campaign materials for local and national candidates will be available. For more information, please contact Len at 230-9199 or email stillblue@sumnerdems.org

October 7

Nashville will be in the Presidential spotlight as John McCain and Barack Obama debate at Belmont University. Students at Volunteer State Community College will be watching the two candidates square-off at a debate party that night. Sumner County Democrats and Republicans will be on hand to discuss the debate and hold a question and answer session afterwards. Refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend. The event will start at 7 p.m. in the Cafeteria in the Wood Campus Center. Volunteer State Community College is located at 1480 Nashville Pike in Gallatin. For more information call 230-3799.

October 8-10

Just for You Women’s Clothing Sale, sponsored by Volunteer Friends of Sumner Regional Health System, 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Cafeteria Area at Sumner Regional Medical Center.  All proceeds benefit the medical scholarship fund and other benevolent causes of the SRHS volunteers.

October 9

The Gallatin Senior Citizens Center annual membershhip meeting begins at 5 p.m. A new board of directors will be elected. Call 451-1531 for more information.

October 9

Rose Mont’s Annual Membership Dinner and Meeting will be at 6 p.m. at Rose Mont on 810 South Water. Dinner will be potluck and everyone interested in historic preservation is invited to attend. Membership is $10 per person or $15 per family per year.

October 11

Brandywood Nursing Home will host a Fall Festival from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. with carnival games, face painting, silent auction and more. Admission  is $6 per family with all proceeds benefiting the Alzheimer Association Memory Walk.

October 11

Gallatin Sertoma Club’s “Eat with the Coaches” all-you-can-eat Country Style Breakfast (ham, sausage, gravy, biscuits and potatoes) is at the Ice Plant at 375 Red River Road from 6 a.m. until 10 a.m. Advance tickets are $5, and $6 at the door. All ticket money and donations are spent in Sumner County on speech and hearing.

October 11

Tractors & Trucks, Shackle Island Collector’s Club, will host a “Fall Harvest Show”  from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at The Long Hollow Jamboree, 3600 Long Hollow Pike, Goodlettsville.  Proceeds from the shows help support the Shackle Island Volunteer Fire Department.   Contact the Club President, Dale Burie, at 615-826-0992 or visit the website   www.tractorsandtrucks.com

October 13

“Kilowatt Ours”, a plan to re-energize America, will be shown at The Palace Theater, 146 North Water at 7 p.m. Admission is free. For more information about the film visit: KilowattOurs.org. This event is hosted by The League of Women Voters.

October 15, 16, 17

Peach Valley Baptist Church, Pastor Dexter D. Mims, Fall Revival is Wednesday through Friday at Gallatin High School Auditorium 7:00 p.m.. nightly.  Guest Pastor will be C.A. Wimberly from First Baptist Hunter Hill, Atlanta.

October 18

The Bethpage Masonic Lodge will host a Pancake Breakfast from 7 to 10 a.m. at Bethpage Elementary School. The cost of a ticket is $5 and all proceeds go to the family of Hunter Tucker, six-year old son of John and Michelle Tucker of Bethpage. He is being treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Donations may also be made to the Hunter Tucker Fund at Macon Bank and Trust in Westmoreland. Contact  Terry Gwaltney at 452-3638 or 804-4898 for more information.

October 19

First Baptist Church, 290 East Winchester Street will celebrate its 7th year of unity between pastor and people beginning at 10:45 a.m. Guest evangelist will be Pastor Dexter Mims of Peach Valley Baptist Church. For more information call 452-8189.

October 26-29

Grace Baptist Church at 410 Old Hwy 31E will host a revival with services at 6:00 nightly. Evangelist Terry Wilkerson will preach each night. A southern gospel quarter will provide the music. For further information call 841-3020.


HIGH SCHOOL REUNIONS

Westmoreland High School Class of 1978 is planning a 30 year reunion October 18 at 6:30 at Macon Bank in Westmoreland. Call Mildred Herald Cornwell, 452-0425 or 972-9749 for more information.


Gallatin High School class of 1953 will have a reunion Saturday, November 1 at Cherokee Steak House. Visitors from other classes are welcome.For information call 452-7276, email bebebop@bellsouth.net or 826-8159, email kjgriggs@aol.com. Monthly get-togethers continue every third Monday of each month at 11 a.m. at the Dining Room.

 

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Letters to the Editor

Dear Editor;

In response to Bill Parks and his comments to a previous letter submitted, I would like to say, you sir have no clue as to what the majority of American women voters truly want, because you are not one of us. (The misspelling of Kool-Aid gave it away.)  By the way, most all of the women I know are working women. The only difference is some of us get a paycheck and some of us don’t.  You would also know that McCain has not supported “Equal pay for equal work,” so those “working women” of which you speak need to wake up and look at the voting records of the candidates before making their decisions.

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Veer Left

Emotions run the gamut in politics

There were lots of emotional highs and lows this week, so let’s get started.

Hayes Loss Hurts

The news of the passing of Johnny Hayes, longtime political fundraising master, hit hard locally. Johnny lived just north of Gallatin and had been a fixture in local, state, and national politics for decades. Scribes better than I will have written about Hayes by the time this column appears, so rather than repeat thoughts found elsewhere, I’ll offer my own anecdote. A couple of years ago Gov. Phil Bredesen came to town on a bus tour kicking off his re-election campaign. Johnny was in charge of raising money for the race. He was also fiercely driven to make sure Bredesen didn’t just win, but would also carry Sumner County, which had been trending Republican for years.

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Obituaries

Charles “Russ” Frank Russell

age 79, of Gallatin passed away Thursday, September 18, 2008 at Sumner Regional Medical Center. Graveside service was Monday, September 22 at 11:00 a.m. from Crestview Memorial. He was born in Rochester County, New Hampshire son of the late Ethan E. Russell and Ruby Lane Russell. In addition to his parents, he is preceded in death by two step-children, Carl and Timothy Henderson. Mr. Russell is survived his wife Kathryn of Gallatin; daughters, Barbara Taylor and husband Johnny of Tulsa, OK, Pamela Jean Conover of Caruthers, CA; step daughters, Regina Johnson and husband Frank of Tulsa, OK, Roxzanne Carranca and husband Allan of San Diego, CA and sister Lilla Gullerson of Ft. Pierce, FL.; several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Arrangements by Family Heritage Funeral Home.


Effie Lou Troutt

age 81, of Westmoreland, passed away Monday, September 22, 2008. Services are today, September 25, at 11 a.m. at Woodard Funeral Home with Brother Larry Emery and Brother Randy Andrews officiating. Interment will follow at Forest Chapel Cemetery. Remaining visitation is today from 9 a.m. until time of service. Mrs. Troutt was retired from the Genesco Shoe Factory and was a member of Providence General Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her parents, Carney Williams and Elvie Thompson Williams; husband, Jack Troutt; daughter, Margie Lou Bandy; son, Edward C. Troutt; grandchildren, Christopher Glenn Briley and Edward Troutt Jr. and great grandchildren, Jerry Sanders, Bonnie Shelton and Heather Shelton. Survivors include her daughter, Joyce Marie Briley of White House; son, Jackie Lee Troutt of Gallatin; sister, Sadie Davis of Mt. Juliet; eight grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren.


Irene Herndon

age 59, of Gallatin, was born March 17, 1949, and passed away Thursday, September 18, 2008. She was preceded in death by her parents, Thomas Rye Smith and Zania Lou Barlow Smith, an infant brother, and another brother, William “Bill” Smith. Mrs. Herndon is survived by her husband, James Herndon, Gallatin; son, Jason Herndon (Nicole), Castalian Springs; daughters, Roxann Wilson and Amanda McCandless, both of Gallatin; brothers, Oral Smith, Gallatin, Ricky Smith (Jana), Gallatin; sisters, Katherine Thyburg (Doug), Seal Beach, CA, Nan McConnell (Roy), Ridgetop, Annette Peters, Pueblo, CO, Glenda Kizer, Ridgetop, Janice Johnson (Bill), Gallatin, Shirley Tuttle (Richard), Gallatin, Carol Brooks (Gary), Bethpage, Bobbie Carter, Gallatin, and three grandchildren, Brittany Wilson, Krista McCandless, and Allison Herndon. Funeral services were at 1 p.m., Monday, September 22, 2008, from the chapel of Alexander-Newby Funeral Home with Bro. Roy McConnell and Bro. Don Craighead officiating. Interment followed in Gallatin Memory Gardens at Crestview.


Judy Carol Hunter

age 58, of Bethpage, passed away Tuesday, September 23, 2008. Funeral service will be Friday, September 26 at 2:00 p.m. from the chapel of Family Heritage Funeral Home. Burial will follow in Mt. Vernon Cemetery. Visitation will begin at 10:00 a.m. and continue until time of service. She was born in Bethpage June 19, 1950, daughter of the late James Monroe McCormick and Rosie Mae Johnson McCormick. In addition to her parents, She is preceded in death by a daughter, Shelia Jean Tidwell and two brothers, Robert Steven McCormick and David Monroe McCormick. She is survived by one son Danny Ray McCullough and Tammy of Portland; granddaughter Shania Rae Tidwell; brothers, Frankie McCormick and Christy of Bethpage, Raymond L. McCormick and Laura of Antioch; three sisters, Lou Krajci of Bethpage, Linda Ann West of Westmoreland and Barbara Sue Thompson of Bethpage.  


Johnny Harold Hayes

one of Tennessee’s most influential leaders in business and politics, died of cancer September 20, 2008 on his Sumner County farm. He was 67.   

Hayes was nationally recognized as a successful businessman, the top fundraiser for both Vice President Al Gore and Governor Phil Bredesen, a member of Governor Ned McWherter’s cabinet, and a director of the Tennessee Valley Authority .   

Over his long career in public and private life, Hayes developed a unique and larger than life identity as a man known for his unfailing optimism, good nature, and keen ability to offer simple, common sense guidance on difficult and challenging problems.  He always tried to help other people accomplish their goals.   He was known and respected as one who truly loved and cared for others.

Hayes was born in Alcoa, Tennessee  on December 14, 1940,  to Harold and Elizabeth Hayes. He was a 1958 graduate of Alcoa High School and a 1962 graduate of Tennessee Technological University.  Hayes moved to Hendersonville , TN where he founded an independent insurance agency called Newman, Hayes & Hogan, which became Newman, Hayes & Dixon.    Hayes also operated a livestock operation, breeding and raising champion Red Angus cattle.  

Hayes served as finance chairman of every Al Gore campaign, including his 2000 presidential race.  He also was finance chair of Phil Bredesen’s successful gubernatorial campaigns.  Governor Ned McWherter appointed him Commissioner of Employment Security and Commissioner of Economic and Community Development.  In 1993, President Bill Clinton nominated  him to the Board of Directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority where he served five years.

This year Hayes was given the American Dream Award by the Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition for his support of initiatives dedicated to making Tennessee a place where dreams can come true for all.

He is survived by his wife Mary Howard Reese Hayes; three children, Craig Hayes of Gallatin, Amy Hayes of New York, and Mary Kate Mouser of Nashville; and three grandchildren, Austin Hayes, Ashley Hayes and Miller Mouser; his sister Libby Breeding and brother Steve Hayes of Alcoa.

Hayes was a member of Bethpage United Methodist Church where he served on the Administrative Board, as Sunday School Superintendent for 18 years, and as a Sunday School teacher.

Visitation was held Monday, September 22, from 2 to 8 pm at Bethpage United Methodist Church, 3140 Highway 31E, Bethpage, TN. The funeral service was held at 10 am Tuesday, September 23, at Gallatin First United Methodist Church, 149 West Main Street, Gallatin, TN. A graveside service was held at 11:00 am (ET) on Wednesday, September 24,  in Alcoa, TN at Sherwood Memorial Gardens, 3176 Airport Highway.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Johnny H. Hayes Scholarship Fund through the Tennessee Tech University Foundation at P. O. Box 1915, Cookeville, TN 38505, or Bethpage United Methodist Church, P. O. Box 100, Bethpage, TN 37022. (Family Heritage Funeral Home 615-452-7115)  

 

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Report says to give traffic enforcement cameras the red light

By Josh Nelson

jngallatin@bellsouth.net


A report released this week takes aim at the red light traffic enforcement camera systems that are in use across the state, including Gallatin’s system.

The report was done by the Tennessee Center for Policy Research, which bills itself as “…an independent, nonprofit and nonpartisan research and education institute dedicated to providing…expert research and timely free market policy solutions to public policy issues in Tennessee,” according to the organization’s web site.

The web site also says the organization “…promotes personal freedom and limited government,” and “…generates and encourages public policy remedies grounded in the ideas of liberty to achieve a freer, more prosperous Tennessee.”

In the report, the organization says, “While cities claim that safety, deterrence, and cost-reducti

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Former Director of EMS gets probation

By Josh Nelson

jngallatin@bellsouth.net


The former Director of the Sumner County Ambulance Service agreed last week to a deal to serve two years of probation for misusing a county-issued purchasing card and making false entries to a government document.

In addition to the probation, Wallace must also perform 150 hours of community service and attend a theft prevention class, among other requirements included in the agreement.

Wallace was charged with the misdemeanors on January 2, 2008, following an investigation by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

Affidavits filed in Sumner County General Sessions Court alleged that Wallace instructed an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) employee to use a credit card issued to

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Survey shows support for modified calendar

By Marjorie Lloyd

mlgallatin@bellsouth.net


People in Sumner County are overwhelmingly in favor of a modified school calendar, according to the results of the calendar survey conducted by the committee formed to address the calendar change. Of those who responded to the surveys, 74% (3,343) indicated support, and 26% (1,163) did not. The largest number of participants in the survey were parents of school children (65%), followed by school employees (21%), community stakeholders (13% and students (1%).

school calendar report, initiated by the Sumner County Board of Education in November 2007, was presented to the Board of Education at the continuance of the regularly scheduled Board study session, Tuesday, September 23, by Judy Wheeler, Assistant Director of Schools for Instruction.

The calendar committee has a two-part recommendation for the Board, supported by Director Benny Bills, which will be officially presented at the October 21 meeting.

The first recommendation is to develop the school calendars in a “modified calendar format” that will include a “minimum of a one-week fall break, a minimum of a two-week winter break, and a minimum of a one-week spring break.”

The second part of the recommendation states, “Union Elementary shall operate annually on the same modified calendar approved for all Sumner County schools.” It also states that Union’s focus become an elementary STEM education center, with emphasis on science, technology, engineering and math.

According to a chart of the 2006-2007 school year, provided in the report, the total number of states, including the District of Columbia, participating in year-round schools is 46, with the total number of public schools participating at 2,764. In Tennessee, the total number of participating public schools for the same school year is 64.

Included in the packet presented to board members was a copy of an article entitled, “Alternatives to the Traditional School-Year Calendar,” from the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, published in Spring 2007, by Shaun P. Johnson and Terry E. Spradlin. The article states, “The need to revise the standard school day and school year is emerging as a primary education policy topic on a national scale.”

The authors note that the history of the public school calendar is based on a 150-year-old system. They note that supporters of modified or year-round calendars point to a reduction in the summer learning loss and an increased time for enrichment and remediation activities. They conclude, “. . .innovative educational reforms that accommodate an increasingly diverse society are necessary.” Yet, they also state, “Before such change is enacted, however, it is essential to evaluate the current use of school time to ensure its effective use on engaged academic learning.”

Eight modified calendar sessions were held throughout the Sumner County in the high schools for public input during the months of February and March 2008. In addition, survey questions and comments were submitted online and via paper forms and compiled by the committee. (See Calendar Comments below.)

Under the heading of Points to Consider in the Report, the unification of all schools within the county under one calendar is the first item on the list. Others items are that the grading period would be nine weeks with a progress report halfway through the period; the first term would end before winter break, and the calendar would be 180 instructional days, as mandated by the state.

Child care, co-parenting agreements, camps, vacations and summer employment and college coursework are listed as topics that should be addressed, as well as the effects upon sports activities, operational costs and the schedule needed for building/maintenance projects.

The modified calendar is on the agenda for the next monthly meeting of the Board of Education.

Calendar comments from the public

The following comments are a random selection of those collected during the survey.

–“I am open to considering a modified Calendar, but I would like to see more information on daycare options for those parents who have to work. What are some options for the two weeks that students will be out of school?”

–“Due to the court-ordered visitation agreement I have with my daughter’s non-custodial, out of town parent, I would not be able to take a vacation with my child without pulling her out of school. “

–“Fall break is an excellent idea. No down side for our family.”

–I would like to see the school year start after Labor Day. The summer heat of August can be unbearable. My kids would come home complaining that their classrooms were so hot. That is not healthy.”

–“We have participated in this in another school system and truly realize the benefits! This would be a great move!”

–“I think the modified calendar is a great idea for the children. The periodic breaks do help them rest and refresh.”

–“As a teacher and a parent, I would LOVE to go to a modified calendar.”

–”I have seen how wonderfully this works in other school systems, and I think this is a terrific calendar to work with. It helps prevent student and teacher burnout.”

–“I love this idea and was hoping it would have been adopted years ago. “

–I believe this type of schedule will keep the students focused and not lose valuable time when they are trying to get back into the swing of school a the beginning of the school year.”

_”I am in favor of the balanced calendar. The benefits for the students far outweigh any negatives that may arise. It will give the students a new attitude and approach for their continued education.”

–“Please leave the calendar as is. My wife is a teacher and depends on a summer job for extra income.”

–“If your child plays sports, they most likely will not benefit from the off time. There will be practice/games during those times.”

–“Why wait? Let’s begin next school year!”

–“Union was a ‘pilot.’ It has been successful.”

–“This sounds like a good idea. There are definitely more pros than cons.”

–“The most important thing we all need to be concerned about is the education of our children.”

–“Do we have to wake up earlier?”

–“This is not much different than what we do now.”

–“I believe students would benefit from a shorter summer break. The three two-week breaks will be a good rejuvenation time. I love it.”

 

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'Secrets and Illusions' at The Palace

For The Gallatin Newspaper

Can You Keep a Secret?  Illusionist Jason Michaels can and his show “SECRETS and ILLUSIONS” is coming home to Gallatin to astound you.  Not just your typical magician, Jason is an internationally award-winning illusionist who calls Gallatin home. “SECRETS and ILLUSIONS” is Michaels’ newest show and will play The Palace Theatre, Thursday, October 9th at 7:00 p.m.

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Out of the ashesFirst Presbyterian Church has new organ

By Marjorie Lloyd
marjorie@thegallatinnews.com

Mozart referred to the organ as the “king of instruments.”


Johann Sebastian Bach may be its most magnificent interpretive voice.


The organ, through its various metamorphoses over the centuries, remains today the singularly exquisite sound of man’s musical acknowledgement of the Almighty.


And fortunately for the people of Gallatin and Sumner County, one of these special instruments has received new life from the ashes of destruction.

 

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Local leader Johnny Hayes loses fight with cancer

By Marjorie Lloyd

marjorie@thegallatinnews.com

Tuesday was a day of mourning and of celebration.
Johnny Hayes succumbed to a lengthy illness at his home in Sideview on Saturday, September 20. He was 67 years of age.


His name has been familiar not only to those who live in Sumner County, but also to Tennesseans and people across the United States for decades. He established himself as a successful businessman, as an efficient, skilled leader in the political arena who sought to promote others rather than himself–helping to shape the government of Tennessee and the United States–as a faithful Christian, a beloved father and husband, and a loyal friend to many.


Hayes was a native son of Tennessee. His parents were Harold and Elizabeth Hayes of Alcoa, and he graduated from Alcoa High School in 1958. He had two siblings, his brother, Steve, who lives in Alcoa, and his sister, Libby Breeding, a resident of Maryville.

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Survey shows support for modified calendar
By Marjorie Lloyd
mlgallatin@bellsouth.net

People in Sumner County are overwhelmingly in favor of a modified school calendar, according to the results of the calendar survey conducted by the committee formed to address the calendar change. Of those who responded to the surveys, 74% (3,343) indicated support, and 26% (1,163) did not. The largest number of participants in the survey were parents of school children (65%), followed by school employees (21%), community stakeholders (13%) and students (1%).
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Coming Events

September 25

Benefit for Portland native Dewel Bullington will be held at the new Portland High School at 7:30 p.m. There will be performances by The McCormick Brothers, Jim & Jesse McReynolds, The Dale McCoury Band, Curly Seckler, Mike Twitty and many more. There is a $10.00 admission charge. All proceeds will be donated to Dewel Bullington.

September 25-28

St. John Missionary Baptist Church at 1085 New Shackle Island Road will host a revival at 7:00 each evening. Lecturer for Thursday is Pastor Cordell Haynie from the Second Baptist Church, Lebanon. Preacher for Thursday is Rev. Frank Kelly Jr., Associate Minister, Second Baptist. Lecturer for Friday is Rev. Anthony Hopgood, Assisting Minister, First Baptist, Gallatin. Preacher for Friday is Pastor Derrick Jackson, First Baptist, Gallatin. Saturday at 7 p.m. features “the preachers” of the East Fork District Association and other Male Choruses. Sunday is American Baptist College Day at 6 p.m.  An offering will be received to benefit the college.  

September 25

Shalom Zone will be hosting an open house in the newly remodeled facility beginning at 10:30 a.m. There will be tours of the building, light refreshments and a short program. The public is invited. Call 442-7575 for more information.

September 26

Brandywood Nursing Home on Bledsoe Street is having a yard sale to benefit the Alzheimer’s Memory Walk.

September 27

The Ruth P. Carter Senior Center will host the 4th Annual Excellence in Aging Award Dinner/Dance/Silent Auction at the Gallatin City Hall at 6 p.m. Tickets are $15 each or two for $25.  For more information call 451-1531.

September 27

The Friends of the Gallatin Library is hosting its 2nd annual TASTE & SEE Kitchen Tour  from 10:00 til 4:00. Seven kitchens will be open; each will feature a guest chef and samples of his/her tastiest treats. Local boutiques will have displays in each kitchen.  Chefs participating include 5 Chefs Restaurant from Portland; September’s Cafe in the Streets of Indian Lake in Hendersonville,  The Chocolate Covered Strawberry, Aprons from Publix, Linda Rausch’s Everyday Gourmet Catering, Greg West from Gallatin High School’s Culinary program, and Steve Sudbury in his own kitchen.  Participating businesses are Occasions, Invitations, Etc., Beverly’s Bouquets,  Red Tulip, Melanie’s Custom Framing, Publix, and Roxanna’s Closet.  Tickets (actually booklets with recipes and features about each kitchen, chef, and business) can be purchased at the Gallatin Library, Perkins, Red Tulip, and the Gallatin Chamber of Commerce.  Only a limited number of tickets have been printed, so get yours today.  (Last year was a sell-out!)  For more information, call 452-6700.

September 27

“My Hometown-Local Business Showcase” is at City Square Shopping Center in downtown Hendersonville from 11 till 3.. Proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Sumner County. Bring your pet dog and participate in our “Pet Contest” -   10 category’s to enter, $ 5.00 per entry, per dog. Contest starts at 12:00.  Visit on-site adoptable dogs, hamburgers/hot dogs, drinks, cotton candy, Antique Classic Car Show, Drakes  Creek Boats on Display, Kids games and inflatables.  Vist local vendor booths, silent auction, door prizes, etc.... Bring the whole family and support the animals at the Humane Society of Sumner County.

www.sumnerhumane.org

September 27

There will be a large multi-family yard sale, bake sale and more at Adcocks Auto Pro at 673 West Main, Hendersonville from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. for Daruk Ministries, a non-profit organization that supports families in crisis. December 10, 2007, Frank and Callie Daruk delivered twin boys 10 weeks premature. Isaiah suffered multiple life-threatening complications as a result of his prematurity and spent the first seven months of his life at Vanderbilt. He is still in a hospital in

Boston and is responding very well to the treatment. Daruk Ministries was born through this journey and the mission is to offer hope, love and support to families enduring critical illness.

September 27

The 4th Annual Library Guild yard sale will be from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the Martin Curtis Hendersonville Public Library, 116 Dunn Street. A wide assortment of clothing, furniture, household and seasonal items will be offered with all proceeds benefiting the library. The Guild is accepting donations of lightly used items for the sale, pick-up is available. To make a donation, or for additional information, please contact Peri Allman at 424.0605 or hvillelibraryguild@comcast.net

September 27

Household hazardous waste collection event will be from 9 a.m. until 2 at Volunteer State College at 1480 Nashville Pike.


October 2

Key to the City  Club of Sumner County will host a benefit, “Celebrations!” - Tablescapes/Fashion Show by Coldwater Creek / Lunch / Market Place with vendor shopping at Country Hills Golf Club in Hendersonville. Doors open at 10:30 a.m. for shopping and lunch, catered by Movable Feast, Inc. at 11:30 a.m. Tickets, $25,  are available in advance by calling 812-6862. All proceeds from this event will go to HomeBound Meals, Gallatin Home Safe and Sumner County Humane society.

October  2

Have you ever thought about being a foster parent but just did not know how to get started or whether it was a good fit for you? Youth Villages would like to help you find the answers. Come and join us at 6:00 p.m. at the Portland Church of Christ located at 200 North Russel Street, Portland. Here you will receive information on our therapeutic foster care program, hear testimonials from current foster parents, and have a chance to win door prizes. Spaces are limited and you must RSVP. Contact Emily Moore at 615-250-7270 or at emily.moore@youthvillages.org for more information and to reserve your spot.

October 2

The Gallatin Business and Professional Women will meet at the Department of Electricity at 6:30 p.m. for the social, followed by a program at 7 p.m. Senator Diane Black and Representative Debra Maggart will speak. Contact BPW president Sara Caldwell at caldwell008@comcast.net for more information.

October 2

Tennessee Rehabilitation Center of Sumner County Open House will be from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. at 1019 Union School Road. RSVP to 451-5826 ext. 10. All center staff will be available to give tours and answer questions.

October 2, 3, 4

Victory Chapel at 800 N. Broadway (109/TGT Rd) is having a flea market during Old Timers Weekend. Booths are available for $8-$15 a day depending on the size. Call Dyan Reynolds at 325-2433, Joyce Meadows at 325-4378 or Nesha Knight at 325-0672 for more details.

October 3, 4

The community is having a yard sale to help restore Durham’s Chapel Historic Roenwald School in Bethpage 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the community center at Old Hwy 31E #2.

October 2-5

Indian Hills Baptist Church at 901 Long Hollow Pike will host a revival 7 p.m. each night and 10:30 a.m. on Oct. 5 with Brother Terry Wilkerson officiating.

October 4

Lambuth Memorial United Methodist Church will sponsor the 1st Annual Benefit Motorcycle Run starting at 1 p.m. This year’s run will benefit the Rev. R. Clay Hall Trust Fund. Rev. Hall is a former Pastor at Lambuth who retired last year because of multiple health problems.   Entry fee per bike is $25.00.  Each rider is requested to further participate by securing donation pledges for miles ridden, participation, etc. Forms for listing pledges can be picked up at the church office at 1042 Hartsville Pike. The 2.5 hour ride will travel through Mt. Juliet and conclude with a post run party at Lambuth at approximately 5:00. For further information or to pre-register, contact the church office at 452-3715.

October 4

The Westmoreland Elementery School Fall Festival will be from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the school at 3012 Thompson Lane. There will be a live auction, Guitar Hero Contest, King and Queen Contest, Dance Revolution, country store and crafts, cake walk, hayrides, cart rides, etc.

October 4

The annual Candlelight Cemetery Tour at the Gallatin Cemetery, sponsored by the Sumner County Museum, is scheduled at 4 p.m. with continuous tours for groups through 10 p.m. Local actors will be presenting information about interesting people who are buried in the historic Gallatin Cemetery. The public is invited.

October 4

The Portland Masonic Lodge  #326 will host it’s annual fish fry at the fellowship hall behind the lodge at 505 Hwy 52E from 3 p.m. until the food runs out. $7 adults, $4 children under 12 years. Proceeds will support lodge charities and functions.

October 4

Safe Place for Animals  fundraiser/rummage sale is from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. at their new location at 243 West Eastland Avenue. To donate your unwanted items call Beckie at 452-9810.

October 6

The Station Camp High School Choral Department will present a formal concert 7:00 p.m. at Center Point Baptist Church in Hendersonville. The concert is free and will feature masterworks by Handel, Mozart, Rutter and others. For more information, please call 230-3185.

October 8-10

Just for You Women’s Clothing Sale, sponsored by Volunteer Friends of Sumner Regional Health System, 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. in the Cafeteria Area at Sumner Regional Medical Center.  All proceeds benefit the medical scholarship fund and other benevolent causes of the SRHS volunteers.

October 9

Rose Mont’s Annual Membership Dinner and Meeting will be at 6 p.m. at Rose Mont on 810 South Water. Dinner will be potluck and everyone interested in historic preservation is invited to attend. Membership is $10 per person or $15 per family per year.

October 11

Tractors & Trucks, Shackle Island Collector’s Club, will host a “Fall Harvest Show”  from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at The Long Hollow Jamboree, 3600 Long Hollow Pike, Goodlettsville.  Proceeds from the shows help support the Shackle Island Volunteer Fire Department.   Contact the Club President, Dale Burie, at 615-826-0992 or visit the website   www.tractorsandtrucks.com

October 18

The Bethpage Masonic Lodge will host a Pancake Breakfast from 7 to 10 a.m. at Bethpage Elementary School. The cost of a ticket is $5 and all proceeds go to the family of Hunter Tucker, six-year old son of John and Michelle Tucker of Bethpage. He is being treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Donations may also be made to the Hunter Tucker Fund at Macon Bank and Trust in Westmoreland. Contact  Terry Gwaltney at 452-3638 or 804-4898 for more information.

October 19

First Baptist Church, 290 East Winchester Street will celebrate its 7th year of unity between pastor and people beginning at 10:45 a.m. Guest evangelist will be Pastor Dexter Mims of Peach Valley Baptist Church. For more information call 452-8189.


HIGH SCHOOL REUNIONS

Gallatin High School Class of 1998 is planning their 10 year reunion for September 27. If you are a member of the graduating class or know a graduate, please contact the committee with your mailing address at classof98ghs@gmail.com or call Amanda Yates Slusher at 230-8229.


Westmoreland High School Class of 1978 is planning a 30 year reunion October 18 at 6:30 at Macon Bank in Westmoreland. Call Mildred Herald Cornwell, 452-0425 or 972-9749 for more information.


Gallatin High School class of 1953 will have a reunion Saturday, November 1 at Cherokee Steak House. Visitors from other classes are welcome.For information call 452-7276, email bebebop@bellsouth.net or 826-8159, email kjgriggs@aol.com. Monthly get-togethers continue every third Monday of each month at 11 a.m. at the Dining Room.


FYI

Thursday is Senior Discount Day at Goodwill. Shoppers 60 years of age and older receive 20% off their entire purchase, (Must present a valid ID at time of purchase). Purchases help fund Goodwill’s mission of helping people get and keep jobs. For employment help, contact the Gallatin Career Solutions office at 452-7745.


Schedule for Gallatin Library closings during installation/training on new automation/circulation system: Closed Monday and Tuesday, September 29 and 30; Open Wednesday, October 1 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.; Closed Thursday, October 2; Open Friday, October 3, 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.; Open Saturday, October 4 from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. No public internet access on any day next week.

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Veer Left

Hypocrisy Update

 Lynn Can’t Spell When Talking About Textbooks

State Rep. Susan Lynn (R-Mt. Juliet) is one of the few members of the General Assembly tech-savvy enough to have a blog. In a recent post (http://susan-lynn.blogspot.com/2007/08/rediculous-textbooks-used-in-tennessee.html#links), Rep. Lynn rails against some of the math textbooks available for use by Tennessee schools and links to a video describing the issues. Her concern for our students would be commendable, if it were not for two glaring issues. First, her arguments against the texts in question show a lack of true understanding about what exactly math textbooks are supposed to teach. Check out the response video at

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Veer Left

I attended the annual meeting of the Tennessee and Kentucky Communication Associations last weekend. It was great to see my friends and colleagues from colleges and universities throughout the mid south and listen to the papers and panels on the latest research and developments in the field. As is my custom, I made sure to check out the political communication papers. Combining my avocation and my vocation into one room at the same time is a wonderful experience!   During one session, I became re-acquainted with a term from my graduate school days–homophily. Simply put, homophily is the tendency of people to like and associate with similar people. As you can probably imagine, homophily plays a key role in voter behavior. If we perceive a candidate as similar to ourselves in regards to status or values, our chances of voting for that candidate are greatly increased.

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